Whenever we get down to the last set of episodes for a season, expectations are extremely high.  We want something that thrills us, excites us, makes us laugh, cry, gives us some extraordinary canon to debate, shocks us to the core, but overall delivers something that we enjoy.  I can honestly say, after two watches, and several attempts to look at the sunny side of things, I just couldn’t enjoy “Clip Show.”  It did get much better on the second viewing, which I didn’t watch until three days later, but it still wasn’t enough for me. Heavens no, it didn’t suck, and it wasn’t a total disaster, but something’s been bothering me for a while now about this whole trial story line, one that didn’t improve with the events of this episode.  And by episode 22, it’s a travesty that the elephant in the room hasn’t been discussed.  

Part of my disappointment with this episode is one that has come before with a script involving Andrew Dabb following a Ben Edlund outing.  Mr. Edlund leaves a lot of breadcrumbs in his stories, setting up extraordinary possibilities for other writers to run wild.  Andrew Dabb, just like he did with “The Girl Next Door” and “There Will Be Blood” (both of those with Dan Loflin), decided breadcrumbs were too messy, and did his own thing, not even trying to use what Edlund gave him.  This is why Andrew Dabb should never, ever be allowed to write an episode after Ben Edlund (we can discuss the gaps between “Everybody Hates Hitler” and “Trial and Error” at another time).  

I could nitpick a lot, like Edlund showing how weak and sick Sam really was, while Dabb went for the “tell, don’t show,” mentality and had Sam spell out to Dean what was wrong with him (sounded like he was pregnant).  But honestly, we don’t need to waste a lot of time on the setup episode for the grand finale dealing with Sam’s health.  Enough time has been spent on this.  Edlund however did a great job of showing Sam’s unstable emotional state, something that should have very much played into this week’s tragic, high stakes story line.  Instead, we got the same old Sam, just paler looking, and the obligatory coughing up blood scene.  That really took away from the emotional possibilities this story had.  By the time Sam was having doubts at the end, I should have felt every bit of agony that was weighing on his fragile psyche.  I wasn’t.  

Before I go into the real issue with the storytelling, why I don’t say what I loved about the episode first?  That way, happy fans can skim through the rest, living well in your much deserved bliss.  

Castiel in the bunker made me so happy.  He was smiling!  â€œI like this bunker.  It’s orderly.”  Sam confesses that Dean is getting ready to change all that, wanting to bring in a ping pong table.  Enter Castiel not knowing much about ping pong!  He showed genuine concern for Sam, and I liked how the almighty angel struggled in that one moment with knowing that he couldn’t help his friend.  Dean, even though he was mad, was still concerned enough for Castiel that he ordered him to stay behind and get better.  He cares I tell you!  There’s nothing Castiel can do to get Dean to hate him so much that he casts him out in his hour of need.  

But you won’t get a better scene than watching an angel try to buy supplies for his human friends in a grocery store.  He even remembered the copy of Busty Asian Beauties!  Good thing he remembered too that humans need toilet paper.  But I died over the store being out of pie.  Dean just can’t catch a break, and to think that’s the one thing that pushes this warrior angel to the edge.  “You don’t understand, I need pie!”  

Andrew Dabb isn’t afraid to introduce bold new directions in canon and mythology.  In the past, they often come across as a head-scratchers, or not sitting right with die hard fans.  For example, there’s the reverse exorcism in “What’s Up, Tiger Mommy?” I found that to be borderline careless, and many fans soundly debated why that would never work.  The idea of an exorcism that cures demons though is quite intriguing to say the least, but I wonder how a cured demon possessing a human works in the end.  It’s usually details like this that are glossed over when these bold leaps in canon are done, and they’re usually never brought up again, making me wonder why Dabb would go there in the first place other than it's fun.  

Once I get past that though, the way the curing ritual was done, the whole process put into it is very fascinating.  I bought it as feasible and very clever.  The whole scene with Sam and Dean listening to the exorcism tape, woven in with the flashbacks, was stunning.  Just the discovery of the dungeon alone takes Sam and Dean to new directions with demons, one that I’d love to see used in the future.  I’m dying now to see Sam try one of these exorcisms, and I’d even love to see Sam and Dean in the future carry on this work.  

As for Abaddon, I didn’t think I’d like the idea of her coming back, but her reaction about Crowley, “The salesman?”, was too awesome.  I’ve been waiting for someone to come along to really challenge Crowley, especially since Meg was easily disposed (Boo!).  Abaddon is an original Knight of Hell and a very dangerous threat.  Oh the possibilities!  

And farewell Jenny Klein!  The fact that she met her demise was a clever inside joke between Andrew Dabb and writing assistant Jenny Klein.  I’m sure Dabb relished in the idea of getting to bump that character off, and doing it with a rather unfortunate oven mishap.  


My Real Problem With The Trials  

In “The Great Escapist,” a question was FINALLY asked by Metatron, one that should have been asked the second Sam and Dean took on these trials to close the gates of Hell.  “You’re gonna have to weigh that choice. Ask yourself what is it gonna take to do this and what will the world be like once it’s done?”  In other words, why aren’t the boys discussing possible ramifications?  Why are they jumping into these trials feet first, when they’ve usually been very cautious about things in the past?  Why aren’t Monster of the Week cases being used to explore the unintended consequences of pursuing this course?  Where are the parallels that really open up this philosophically powerful issue for debate?  

What are Sam and Dean’s real motivation for the trials other than they believe that with no demons, there will be no torment of humans on earth?  Theirs is a quest enthusiastically taken on by two men who have been scarred by these beings.  Locking all demons out is their answer.  Yet as this episode showed, a priest back in 1958 had another answer.  Who’s right?  Isn’t it better to try and save those innocent souls than lock them out of earth, doomed to an eternity of torment?  Even Sam and Dean got the extremely rare opportunity at second chances, freed from their times in Hell.  Why can’t other souls be given that chance?  Will closing the gates also mean that no one will ever be able to enter Hell once they die?  Won’t that wreak some horrible havoc on the natural order?  Where do the bad souls go?  Do they remain ghosts on earth, making life even more impossible for hunters like Sam and Dean?  Why haven’t Sam and Dean wondered this?   

On the flip side, Metatron has come to Castiel with a similar quest.  Do the angel trials and close the gates of Heaven.  After all, the chaos caused by the demise of the archangels requires a remedy of drastic action.  Lock them all up together, make them sort out their differences.  Here’s a motivation I can stand behind.  However, what are those consequences?  Does this mean that no one will be able to get into Heaven either?  I know it’s been said a few times on this site before, but what gives Sam, Dean, and Castiel the right to banish every human to a life of “No Hell below us, above us only sky?”  Does the alternate reality of “The French Mistake” becomes the actual reality?    

Why did God choose Metatron to write these instruction manuals anyway?  What purpose was behind giving humans the power to pull these “great levers?”  Was it to protect humanity from destruction, or was it for God to once again administer one of his tests?  I’m sure if that question was posed to Dean, he wouldn’t care what the answer is.  As long as demons, and probably angels, are free from the earth, he’s happy to going back to his life of free will.  Is that why God did this though?  To make Dean Winchester happy?  If this show has taught us one thing, it’s that there are always consequences to actions, no matter what the intent.  In the end, I see this whole thing as being an “out of the frying pan, into the fire,” type scenario.  I’m stunned Sam and Dean don’t see it after all they’ve been through.

These are exactly the type of questions at least Castiel could have raised in the bunker.  Yeah, he’s got his own doubts right now, and is going through the whole mind control thing, so he’s not exactly himself.  But I keep thinking back to “Two Minutes Til Midnight,” when Sam told Castiel of his plan to say yes to Lucifer and jump into the pit.  Castiel was the first one to tell him it’s a plan with merit.  I miss that about Castiel.  The weakened being that was still in the fold, still fighting for the underdog.  This season he’s a crusader taking on Heaven alone, and making a ton of mistakes doing it.  Or is he?  We really don’t know at this point.  All I know is I wish he at least had Meg by his side.  They would have been the most unlikely pair to take on the universe, no?  Sorry, I digress.

There was a parallel in “Clip Show,” but it really failed in looking at that bigger picture of the season long arc.  This series has never been afraid to bring forth issues that put our heroes narrowly walking along the thin line of right and wrong.  It’s usually when these issues are explored that the show goes into extraordinary territory.  This script was the chance, using Crowley’s evil intimidation tactics, to expand on the whole quandary of why are they really doing this.  What is driving Sam and Dean to push themselves and what do they hope to truly get from it?  Is it revenge, or a chance at a new life?  I need to know that they’ve considered the welfare of the world at large as well, and not their own desires.  This inability to hit issues hard, opting for busier scripts, more shout outs and character callbacks, is where seasons six, seven and eight have really failed in the writing.    

A major theme of this episode is unintended consequences, which is perfect given how far Sam and Dean are in the trials.  There’s the priest who conducted the experiments, believing he could cure a demon, and get a second chance on earth as a righteous being.  Back in 1958 Hell got wind of this, and that’s why Abaddon came to earth.  This couldn’t continue.  She began killing anyone associated with this cause, including the Men of Letters.  Chances are she was determined to find the MOL hide out so she could destroy any info about the curing ritual.  One man’s passion and belief stirred up a whole mess of trouble for people he didn’t even know.    

As you can see here, what seemed like an act of salvation led to an act of destruction.  So there’s the parallel.  Sam and Dean are doing the trials, intent on closing the gates of Hell, but Crowley isn’t taking that lying down.  He’s going to destroy all the good that Sam and Dean have done.  Unintended consequences.  People that they saved are now dying because of them.  That’s all fine and good, but Sam having doubts was tied more into Crowley’s threat than the bigger picture that he should have been exploring all along.  No doubt Sam is sick and tired, and the trials are wearing him very thin, but wouldn’t have there been more emotional payoff if he was forced to consider what life would be like if the gates of Hell were closed?  A little something else to weigh on that already tired mind?  I don’t buy that he’s sacrificed so much of his health and well being these last few months just to give up because of a death of yet another acquaintance in his life.  The stakes need to be higher.  

Sarah said something to Sam that made me take pause.  He’s more focused now.  He’s grown up.  That was a sweet sentiment (although girlfriend is so wrong about the hair), but what did that have to do with Sam’s role in changing the entire order of things?  That he’s grown up enough to do it?  Oh, the conversations these two could have had if given time.  I wish that the encounter with Sarah could have happened much sooner in the episode, so Sam’s doubts about the trials could have been raised through Sarah.  She could have asked him the questions that haven’t been asked so far, like what happens to the natural order if Hell is closed.  What is he hoping to get from all this?  What is the point?      

Just think about it.  Sam has learned since his first encounter with Sarah that he’s an abomination, tainted with demon blood.  He’s no different than the Nephilim that Castiel killed.  They didn’t ask to be that way.  It was forced upon them.  They just want to live their lives, but these angels and demons won’t leave them alone though.  The unintended consequence of accepting these trials is Sam gets his chance to be pure, be rid of the demon blood that’s curse him his entire life.  His is a greater quest than what that quick conversation with Sarah ended up reflecting.  It minimized Sam’s truly great purpose in all this.  It kind of made Sarah’s return pointless.  

The sloppy pacing and plotting of the episode really ruined some amazing opportunities.  Remember Pamela's stern warning to Sam on her deathbed in “Death Takes A Holiday?”  That!  Sam needed something that powerful to raise those doubts.  Crowley’s monologuing just wasn’t enough.  

Bottom line, no one is thinking this through, and the writers have chosen not to explore it either.  It’s kind of a mess.  By episode 22, that’s kind of pissing me off.  I’m desperately seeking any form of symmetry in the storytelling that doesn’t come from a guy named Edlund.    

Bottom line, I’m giving “Clip Show” a B-.  There were some great elements in there, but it didn’t come together.  At this stage in the game the right questions still aren’t being asked.  All the delicious ramifications and philosophical impacts aren’t being explored, and now I’m very worried that the season finale isn’t going to be able in 42 minutes to adequately answer all the questions that have been lingering from these season eight episodes.  Plus, any scene that makes Sam and Dean look completely incompetent like leaving a Knight of Hell alone to easily escape earns a major ding in my book.  

 

Comments  

Cathia
# Cathia 2013-05-13 03:28
Totally agree with every single word!! That episode clearly lacked of something.

And yes, another continuity error. Jenny was in Season 7, Chuck stopped writing by the end of Season 5. Crowley got himself a crystal ball?
Alice
# Alice 2013-05-13 11:03
A total continuity error, but it was obviously Andrew Dabb risking it for the inside joke. I forgive that one.
Boyocaz
# Boyocaz 2013-05-13 06:47
Thank you Alice finally a critical discussion without the rose coloured squee/hugs glasses. I am actually seeing season 6 in a much better light on rewatch than the hot mess of part 2 of season 8.
st50
# st50 2013-05-13 07:27
Thanks alice.
I agree... so many possibilities missed.
I'm really hoping the finale can bring it all together.
Ale
# Ale 2013-05-13 07:30
Alice, there may be consequences in closing the gates of Hell, or maybe not - we will see. But I honestly can't see why Sam and Dean should be debating if they should or shouldn't close them for good. For me it's like debating whether they should fight nazis necromancers (or only nazis, by the way). Or course they must! Should they let them be, leave them alone to do their thing, because it is supposed to have a balance between good and evil? What does it mean? We can debate here forever what is evil, but believe me, there are things too obviously wrong. Nazis for me is one. Demons too. They may try to cure them all, but I don't think it is possible, since how many of them are in Hell, and how many more are made, per day? Lock them up!

If you fight for something, if you do something to defend your beliefs, there will be consequences. It is unavoidable. You being alive, living your live, change thinks, for better or worse. I believe you must ponder about consequences of your actions, but if you think too much, you will be paralised.

Sam and Dean have seen a gate of Hell before. It was stated in S01 that demons have a problem crawling out of Hell, there were few demons among us, but the Apocalipse changed it. Now, they are trying to correct it. How can this be bad? And the tablets were written by God himself, so how wrong can they be? It worked for the Leviathans!

Ok, I might need to bite my tongue depending on what the writers have got for us, but as I said before, I cannot see why Sam and Dean should be making highly philosophical questions right now.
nickmaniac
# nickmaniac 2013-05-13 08:22
I agree with Ale, and to some extent I'm glad they're not DISCUSSING the repercussions more and having extended expositions on the rightness and wrongness of their actions. To be honest, I've loved the SPN episodes that have more action, less talk; episodes like 'Great Escapist' and 'Free to Be You and Me', for instance, while brilliant, don't warrant my rewatching as much as the more action-filled ones (which 'Clip Show' was, I thought). Of course, I appreciate where you are coming from, Alice, and all viewers watch SPN differently. That's what's so wonderful and infuriating about our show, isn't it??
Jean
# Jean 2013-05-13 08:34
Dean: Dude, if anybody else, I mean anybody, pulled that kind of crap I would stab them in the neck on principle. Why should I give him a free pass?
Sam: *exasperated* ...Because it's Cas...

Isn't that how everyone reacted towards the Grand Canyon thing in 8.21 The Great Escapist? XD

Me: Dude, if any other writer, I mean any other writer, pulled that kind of continuity error we would complain about it for weeks on principle. Why should I give him a free pass?
Everyone else: *exasperated* ...Because it's Edlund...
E
# E 2013-05-13 08:52
Alice, you've nailed it on the head! I totally agree. The seeds for greatness were all there in this episode, but the attention was not placed in the correct places, the proper questions were not asked.

I guess I am in the minority about the Cas scene; I hated it. He was made into a clown, and buffoon for no reason other than comic relief. I don't mind it when Cas is humorous like in 99 problems (I found a liquor store, and I drank it!) especially when the humor is directly connected to what is going on with the larger story. But here, he was just inept for no reason, or because someone thought it would be "funny."

I am beginning to wonder if the writing during the Kripke years was more collaborative; if it happened with multiple writers in the room fleshing things out and drawing attention to those issues that needed to be raised and filled out. Maybe it's why the story in those first 5 years were so interconnected; the episodes were always reflecting back on each other and making larger points over time. It was ingenious and so very deep and satisfying. It seems now that the writers are writing in isolation. The stories don't really seem to connect very well, and major points raised in one script are not addressed in the next one consistently (Edlund and even Robbie Thompson get a pass here IMO). Maybe that was just the genus of Kripke?
st50
# st50 2013-05-13 09:05
You're not alone, E. I hated the shopping scene, too. It didn't work for me at all.

I didn't like the whole premise, and several elements bothered me - knocking over displays, breaking the egg. Slapstick comedy that just didn't work for me, personally. I'm tired of the "I just don't get humans" side of Cas. He's been watching for centuries, supposedly, with the Winchesters for years, and the rest of the angels seem to be capable of proper interactions. Cas should certainly be capable of learning after all this time.

I am also missing that consistent guiding hand, pulling elements from one episode into the next. It has been missing since the Kripke era, although even Gamble seemed to have a tighter reign on the canon issues than Carver.

If this somehow comes all together this week (or even next season) I will eat my hat and bow to Carver, but I've given up hope of having everything addressed.
Too many loose ends for my liking.
eilf
# eilf 2013-05-13 09:50
Quote:
I guess I am in the minority about the Cas scene; I hated it. He was made into a clown, and buffoon for no reason other than comic relief. I don't mind it when Cas is humorous like in 99 problems (I found a liquor store, and I drank it!) especially when the humor is directly connected to what is going on with the larger story. But here, he was just inept for no reason, or because someone thought it would be "funny."
Quote:
I didn't like the whole premise, and several elements bothered me - knocking over displays, breaking the egg. Slapstick comedy that just didn't work for me, personally. I'm tired of the "I just don't get humans" side of Cas. He's been watching for centuries, supposedly, with the Winchesters for years, and the rest of the angels seem to be capable of proper interactions. Cas should certainly be capable of learning after all this time.
*Whisper* I agree with you both ...
Leah unlogged
# Leah unlogged 2013-05-13 14:26
I completely agree with you E, both on the Cas thing and the Kripke thing.I love Cas myself but that scene just rubbed wrong. I don't mind naïve Cas, but bumbling Cas is too much. Even the naivety is getting old now. He should be much more enlightened by now (Percysowner, I agree with you now!)

IMO Kripke was an under appreciated genius. He was ripped by the fandom and it was sad to me. I am not at the point that I think Carver is a failure, there have been many improvements from last season but each new showrunner makes me appreciate him more!! He had a great eye for the big picture while watching the day to day details.
percysowner
# percysowner 2013-05-13 19:16
Since we know Cas is coming back next season, I really wish the writing had made ME agree with you instead. Maybe Cas will grow up next year?
Gerry
# Gerry 2013-05-13 10:34
Nice review, Alice. I had issues in my review, too, though I think having Dean raise the thorny problem about the human soul in the exorcism means it may be addressed in the finale--that is my hope.

I think this episode has a lot of intriguing pieces, but they were not knit together well, which kept it from being as good as it could have been.

I wanted more continuity of BadAss Cas from Edlund's episode. He should be more suspicious of plans to draft him into any kind of angel plan. He should be more suspicious of whether Metatron is just a pencil pusher. Like E above, I didn't really buy the grocery scene completely. I don't mind Cas not knowing how to use money, but leaving doors open, crushing eggs, knocking over displays-that seemed over the top just for comic effect. I don't think using Cas for comic relief is a good use of the character and I don't believe he's that bumbling (I do believe he wanted that pie, though (-: ). I'd much rather he was used to discuss the ramifications of closing heaven and hell.

If my suspicions of Metatron being more than he says are on the mark, I really like the echo of Crowley's story if Metatron is taking advantage of a power vacuum to take control, especially if that's what Abaddon intends to do in Hell. I like it when the pieces knit together, especially at this time of the season. But will they?

And Sam's story just has to come together in the way Edlund pointed, because otherwise he's just been misused all season. And since Sam has been pushing most of the plot, that's a huge problem. In the early part of the season, at least Dean had Purgatory, which was a great arc. Now he's just supporting Sam's, so that arc has to work for this season to come together.
MelT
# MelT 2013-05-13 11:25
I love this review and I agree about the missing debate. I mean there are HUGE issues here with no thought being put into them. Closing the gates of Hell will result in dead bad people going where? Closing the gates to Heaven? Will people still go there? Will ghosts walk the earth with nowhere to go? Does everyone go to Purgatory? Is it the zombie apocalypse? It's a huge question for me that at least someone should have thought of or at least mentioned in passing.
percysowner
# percysowner 2013-05-13 12:36
I Agee with this review as well. This episode was very lacking. Bringing back Sarah and then not using her to examine Sam's mindset more was a lost opportunity.

I agree that the issue of what happens when a demon is cured is a problem. I have always wanted demons to have the chance for redemption, but not while sharing a human body. Who gets the rights to the body, especially if the demon decides he wants to stay put?

As much as I am unimpressed by Dabb as an writer, I suspect that the writers group came up with the idea of curing a demon as the last trial and I think they all aligned off on the method. It is part of the continuing trend of forgetting that the person who owns the body is still in there unless it is needed for a plot point (the nurse in Lucifer Rising or the serial killer in whatever). It took Sera Gamble to remind the rest of the writing staff that if Sam slept with a Ruby possessed woman it would be rape. She was the only one who remembered that and made them make Ruby's vessel brain dead. So I think the writer just wave off the person inside.

I will note that I HATED Pamela's speech to Sam. I would have been fine with her saying that Sam was making a mistake by doing what he was, but to say that his INTENTIONS were only served to tell the audience that Sam was at heart a bad guy that season.

I have stated before that I am very disappointed in this season. This episode did not make things better. It mad them worse.
Amyj
# Amyj 2013-05-14 17:39
Quote:
I Agee with this review as well. This episode was very lacking. Bringing back Sarah and then not using her to examine Sam's mindset more was a lost opportunity.

I agree that the issue of what happens when a demon is cured is a problem. I have always wanted demons to have the chance for redemption, but not while sharing a human body. Who gets the rights to the body, especially if the demon decides he wants to stay put?

As much as I am unimpressed by Dabb as an writer, I suspect that the writers group came up with the idea of curing a demon as the last trial and I think they all aligned off on the method. It is part of the continuing trend of forgetting that the person who owns the body is still in there unless it is needed for a plot point (the nurse in Lucifer Rising or the serial killer in whatever). It took Sera Gamble to remind the rest of the writing staff that if Sam slept with a Ruby possessed woman it would be rape. She was the only one who remembered that and made them make Ruby's vessel brain dead. So I think the writer just wave off the person inside.

I will note that I HATED Pamela's speech to Sam. I would have been fine with her saying that Sam was making a mistake by doing what he was, but to say that his INTENTIONS were only served to tell the audience that Sam was at heart a bad guy that season.

I have stated before that I am very disappointed in this season. This episode did not make things better. It mad them worse.
seco0nding this.
love2boys
# love2boys 2013-05-13 12:45
Alice, I love your review. I didn't love the episode at all. I was left sad, depressed and disturbed. For a lot of the reasons you mentioned. Oh well.

But here's the obvious:

"Pride and Prejudice and Zombies" tells us that when the doors of hell are closed, the dead walk the earth as zombies.

I guess Sam hasn't read that yet. We don't need no stinkin' zombies!
Raven
# Raven 2013-05-13 13:42
"Plus, any scene that makes Sam and Dean look completely incompetent like leaving a Knight of Hell alone to easily escape earns a major ding in my book." - This, exactly. The writers have been taking more and more opportunities to make the guys look like morons, just so they can justify doing whatever the hell they want to do whether it makes sense or not. The episode where they could finally see Bobby as a ghost was a big one in my book. The Winchesters looked like a couple of 4th graders on their first ghost hunt with Spongebob. The writers really need to buckle down and tighten up their scripts - it's practically a whole new staff. They have no excuse for being bored, burnt out or just plain lazy.
Bevie
# Bevie 2013-05-13 15:44
I have to agree with you this time Alice. There is no way I will ever 'enjoy' this episode. Loving Sarah since season one I was devastated that she was killed! Couldn't help crying and not hearing the rest of the episode. Depressed completely! :cry:

The acting, as always, was superb by all! That is never an issue. It is always in the writing and the waste of killing off such a memorable and loved character hurt. Why didn't they off Amelia? She was the latest 'love' of Sam!

The ramifications of the closing off of hell and heaven can hurt your head trying to imagine. I feel leery of doing either of those.

What I liked about the epi was Cas shopping for Dean and "Dude!". Also, am hoping Abaddon gets to Crowley and rips off his arms and legs before dumping him in a dumpster and taking over. The boys can then try to cure Crowley when they find him. :D
janiebee64
# janiebee64 2013-05-13 16:38
I really am not surprised that Sam and Dean haven't questioned the consequences closing the gates of Hell may cause. It just not in their nature. They see a way to rid the world of demons and they go after it wide open..that's not usual. It's because of this shoot first ask questions later attitude that they get into trouble so often..dying..g oing to hell..going to Purgatory..open ing Lucifer's cage...getting inncocent people killed(Jus In Bello comes to mind) and even other hunters(Abandon All Hope for example), so not questioning is part of who they are...and why we have so many nail biting..hellatu s season finales.

The one question I think they should be asking is..If they close both gates..Heaven and Hell..then where will all the souls of those who died go? I'm thinking that would be a HUGE consequences. Having all these souls floating around with no place to go..not good. I've been wondering since watching CLIP SHOW if maybe Jeremy has something in mind with this story. If Metatron is considering and discussing with Cass closing the gates of Heaven but only for a short time so the angels can work out their problems then maybe as time goes on and the souls that belong in Hell become a problem here the boys will have to reopen the gate.

One thing they should know by now is that you can't mess with the natural order of things and not suffer the consequences.


Take care,
Jane
paloma
# paloma 2013-05-14 07:51
Thanks Alice for the review.
I think that there will be consequences after what Metraton said, and yes it is an horrible idea "a angels family reunion", but I don't think that the problem will be souls trapped in earth, although is the writers go to this path, they have should be bring this before. Over all for the Purgatory. The souls enter but after they can't go out without an exterior help. On the other hand sorry, but resurrect the deaths is never a good idea and it was the worst mistake that Dean have done to the date, it is never bring anything good.