“Stretching back to Cain and Abel. It's in your blood, your father's blood, your family's blood.” ---Michael, “The Song Remains the Same”

Supernatural has explicitly laced Biblical lore through its mythology since season four---and season nine has shaped itself around that of Genesis. The Garden of Eden and the Fall of Man was a focal point for the story surrounding the fall of the angels, Castiel's stint as a human, and the serpents let into the various Gardens such as Gadreel's possession of Sam and intrusion into the MOL Bunker. As we transition into the back half of the season, we're watching the story unfold around the aftermath of the serpent's infection. In “First Born,” we are given yet another Biblical story---also from Genesis and after the Fall of Man---for the show to use as framework: that of Cain and Abel and the First Murder.

First, let's examine the Biblical story.

Cain and Abel are the first brothers in Biblical history, born of Adam and Eve---and tainted by the Fall of Man. Unlike life in the Garden, where food, shelter, and safety were provided for, the world has become a place of danger and hard work. Cain is a farmer and Abel a shepherd.


Each brother prepares an offering to the Lord, hoping to please Him and gain favor for their efforts. Genesis tells us, “In the course of time Cain brought some of the fruits of the soil as an offering to the Lord. And Abel also brought an offering---fat portions from some of the firstborn of his flock. The Lord looked with favor on Abel and his offering, but on Cain and his offering he did not look with favor. So Cain was very angry, and his face was downcast.”

It creates tension between the two brothers---Abel is favored by God and pleasing while Cain is rejected by the Lord, despite his hard work tilling the soil. It leads to a fatal encounter. Genesis tells us, “Now Cain said to his brother Abel, “Let’s go out to the field.”While they were in the field, Cain attacked his brother Abel and killed him.”

This is a consequence of the serpent's invasion into the Garden and the Fall of Man. Now that humanity knows of good and evil, they can be ruled by their darker emotions---such as jealousy, envy, and pride. It can lead to dire outcomes---as it does with Cain and Abel here. We're told that Cain killed his brother out of jealousy, that since he could not garner favor from God, he would punish Abel for receiving it. It's a horrific moment---and one that will change humanity even further.


Cain is punished for this crime. God tells him, “What have you done? Listen! Your brother’s blood cries out to me from the ground.Now you are under a curse and driven from the ground, which opened its mouth to receive your brother’s blood from your hand. When you work the ground, it will no longer yield its crops for you. You will be a restless wanderer on the earth.”

Much as mankind had been banned from the Garden, Cain is banned from his home and family---and his livelihood. He is cast out into the wilderness further---and he is marked so that “no one who found him would kill him.”

Cain and Abel's story makes for a great framework to build the story of the Winchesters around. The story is simple but powerful---with its details open to interpretation. After all, we're not told precisely in these passages what Cain's weapon was---or what his mark entailed. Supernatural doesn't simply want to use this Biblical story as simple allegory, however---instead it takes this story and adapts it to fit into their mythology in a beautiful way.

Let's examine how Cain appears in “First Born.”


Even though we're not told that it's Cain just yet, we're introduced to him in violent fashion. The episode begins with a flashback to 1863 as Cain storms into a house, bent on murder and destruction. It's clear that he's not human. With a simple touch, he burns his way through each demon. In his other hand is a wicked jawbone blade.

In the present day, Dean and Crowley hunt down clues to find that very same blade. They end up gaining assistance from a hunter named Tara. She and John Winchester exorcised a demon together---but not before it said something about the First Blade. It intrigued her enough to put together a location spell to find it. Dean and Crowley help her execute the spell---and they get the clue to head to Missouri.


When they get there, however, it's not a blade they find. Instead there's a man---a bee keeper---and Crowley is deathly afraid of him. He's “dark,” and as Dean scoffs at the King of Hell's alarm, Crowley tells the hunter just who that is: the Father of Murder, Cain himself.

Cain isn't pleased to have a hunter and the King of Hell on his doorstep and demands that they tell him how they found him. He's been in hiding since he retired from being a Knight of Hell and he wants nothing to do with them. Cain is an imposing figure, and even though he isn't exacting the violence we saw in that opening sequence, we can tell that he can at any moment if he so desired. This becomes evident when Cain silences Crowley with just a gesture.


Dean informs Cain that they're not there for him, but for the First Blade. The spell was meant to locate the Blade---and was a “one time deal.” They had no idea that Cain was there when they arrived.

Cain knows there's more to the story and demands they tell him why they seek the First Blade. They tell him that they need the blade the archangels used to kill all the Knights of Hell---save Abaddon of course. It's the only thing they've been able to find that has any properties that could kill her. Cain tells them, “If your friend here could talk, he would tell you that I trained the Knights of Hell. I built that entire demonic order with my own hands -- Abaddon included.” He even goes on further to tell them that it was him, not the archangels, that slaughtered the Knights of Hell.

Supernatural takes its lore and weaves it intricately with the Biblical story of Cain and Abel here. By committing the first murder, Cain becomes a demon of the highest order, powerful, immortal---and most of all deadly. He became, “the best at being the worst,” and it all started with his long ago crime of fratricide. In many ways, this transformation is an elaboration on his punishment---and it fits right in with the structure of the show's mythology beautifully.


Cain refuses to tell them anything, commanding that they, “Never return.”

Crowley seems more than okay with that, quipping, “Can we leave the country now?” But Dean isn't ready to give up. He knows Cain is hiding the weapon somewhere and they decide to break into the house after Cain leaves. They need that weapon, and Winchester stubbornness wins out again.

As they fruitlessly look for the First Blade, Dean realizes a truth about Cain. He comes across a picture of a woman---taken around the time of the Civil War---and notices that her ring matches the same one that Cain was fiddling with on his ring finger. Cain had “retired” for a reason. He had found love.

Cain is non too pleased to find Dean and Crowley snooping through his home---especially since they brought trouble with them. Demons are after both, and one wants to serve them up to Abaddon to gain her favor. Cain only has the power to keep them out for so long---and so Dean and Crowley set to barricading themselves against the incoming onslaught.


In this whole sequence, we can tell that Cain is vetting them. He's watching to see how they react to this turn of events. Dean kicks into full hunter mode, putting on a magnificent display. As Cain lets in the demons to test Dean Winchester, he watches carefully as Dean uses everything around him as a weapon---and that he won't quit no matter how dire. It is a dance of death, a thing of terrible beauty to behold---and it is the very action that Dean must execute in order to be worthy in Cain's eyes.

Once it's over, Cain tells Dean, “I felt connected to you right from the beginning. Kindred spirits, if you will. You and I are very much alike.” This draws an indignant response from Dean---considering that he never killed his brother. Cain turns this on Dean, asking, “You saved yours. Why?”


Dean simply replies, “Because you never give up on family. Ever.”

Supernatural takes the story of Cain and Abel, and the story of Sam and Dean and begins to blend them beautifully together. Cain tells them that the spell brought them to him because he is the source of the Blade's power---and then he tells them that it is gone. Dean knows what this weapon was---a jawbone of an animal---and he scoffs, “The jawbone you used to kill Abel because he was God's favorite.”

Cain simply replies, “Abel wasn't talking to God. He was talking to Lucifer.”

Lucifer. The archangel tampered with another set of brothers---the very first pair.

It turns out that Lucifer wanted to turn Abel into his pet---into a monstrous demon. Instead, Cain offered up himself. All he wanted in return was for his younger brother's soul to be delivered up into Heaven---and away from Hell's clutches. It comes with a price, however. In order for Abel to go to Heaven as Cain has asked, Lucifer demands that he kill his brother. It has to be his hand that ends Abel's life---nothing else will do.

It's a brilliant twist of the Cain and Abel story, making it fit the Supernatural framework with elegance and subtly. Cain goes from being the jealous man we see in the Biblical story to a man desperate to save his brother from a fate far worse than death.


Cain reveals his Mark---the one the Bible tells us that God gave him for his crime. Once again, Supernatural adapts this to their mythology wonderfully. God didn't mark Cain. Someone else did. Cain tells Dean who gave it to him, “From Lucifer himself.”

Satisfied with Dean's skill and reasons for wanting the Blade, Cain decides to give Dean his Mark. He must do so as it is the only method in which to use the First Blade. Without it, the Blade is useless.

But Cain has one more thing to do first. He must apologize to his deceased wife. We learn the truth of what killed her---and why Cain turned on his Knights. Dean was right. Cain had fallen in love with a woman---one that “knew who I was... and what I was. She loved me unconditionally. She forgave me. ” He had decided to eliminate his Knights and retire for Collette---but Abaddon didn't make it easy.


She possesses Cain's wife, killing her while still inside. She snaps Collete's neck, taunting Cain. Before he can deliver the killing blow, however, she exits, leaving Cain to hold his dying wife's body. It is a heartbreaking moment as we see the Father of Murder break down. In the present, we watch Cain tell her to look away now as he must kill yet again in order to make it possible for Dean to leave as there are yet more demons flocking to his home.

The transfer of the mark is a profound moment as Cain and Dean grasp hands, almost in their own dance. Once it is complete, we see him teleport Dean and Crowley away, leaving us to witness the horrific red flashes of light as Cain kills his way through each demon invader.


Cain clearly reflects Dean Winchester beautifully. Cain is the older brother. In this interpretation, we can tell---despite his violent action---that he clearly loved his brother. He was put into a difficult situation with no winning choice. Either he allowed Abel to be tricked into becoming an evil being by Lucifer, posing as God, or he took his brother's place---and life. It's not hard to imagine how this exchange would have happened. Lucifer would have held all the cards, and Cain desperate to protect his brother from becoming a creature of darkness would have done anything to prevent it.

And so, he became a vicious monster.


We can't help but feel deep sympathy for him and his situation, though. Cain didn't kill Abel out of spite. He didn't do it because he was envious of his brother's accepted offering. It wasn't because God saw Abel as “his favorite.” Cain killed his brother out of love.

Dean may not have taken this action---in fact we've seen him consistently take the opposite approach---but we can tell that when he hears this story it touches a nerve deep inside. After all, Lucifer had toyed with his own brother. He could clearly understand Cain's agonized decision to kill Abel after Lucifer threatened to turn him into a violent monster. Dean had considered the very same thing once learning that Sam was Lucifer's chosen vessel. He would do anything to prevent his brother from becoming Lucifer's puppet.

Cain's story doesn't stop reflecting Dean's there, though. For his crime against Abel we learn that he is banished from his home and family, left to wander the earth and unable to farm. In Supernatural, Cain is banished from humanity, forever changed into a monstrous demon. He is banished to wander the earth, looking for a place to call his own. It's why he's so defensive of his home when Dean and Crowley burst in on it. It is his and he has settled comfortably into his anonymity. He has no desire to be banished again---and yet we see just that. He tells them, “Join me for the last meal I will ever have in this place.” After they leave, he will, too---never to return.

At the end of “Road Trip,” we see Dean banish himself from Sam. He is also banished from his home, the MOL Bunker. He let in the serpent that is Gadreel---and for his crime he must now pay by being exiled. It is a punishment he ascribes to himself. He will suffer the consequences of what he did alone. No other punishment can be anymore harsh than this for Dean. He cherishes family---and has come to do the same with the Bunker. To be cast out into the world without his family next to him is a cruel fate.

Much like Cain suffered becoming a demon, however, Dean will endure this punishment in order to save his brother. This time he's not saving Sam from Lucifer or his soulless self---or the Trials. Instead, Dean is saving Sam from himself. Simply put, he'd rather not turn his brother into him.


Crowley hits this issue on the head when he tells Dean, “Your problem, mate, is that nobody hates you more than you do. Believe me, I've tried.”

The King of Hell knows what self loathing feels like, and he knows what it looks like when someone else wears it. And yet, he stands up for the brothers in various ways. He tells Dean that they “need all the help they can get,” and “You are worthy.”

Crowley knows that the only way for things to work out in the end is for Sam and Dean to work through their issues---and if they are to have any hope of overcoming what Cain and Abel could not---they'll have to do it together.






Meanwhile, we're watching Sam smart from the knowledge that Dean had him possessed by Gadreel. He is Abel in this story. His brother chose his path for him. Dean chose to save him even when he expressed a wish to die. Cain killed Abel in order to save him from Lucifer's lies.

The Bible tells us nothing of Abel after his murder. His story ends there. It's this fact that allows for Supernatural to weave their story as they see fit. The fact that they tie Abel and Lucifer together fits in brilliantly with the canon already established. Abel is the younger brother, as Sam is, so it makes sense that Lucifer would target him. Lucifer is a younger brother, himself.

But what makes Sam's story in this episode so powerful is his interaction with a different angel: Castiel.

The angel coaxes several times to reach out to the elder Winchester. He says, “Maybe we should call Dean,” and each time Sam backs away from that proposal with a rebuff.

They are trying to extract the tiny bit of grace Gadreel left behind---his “angelic fingerprint”---so they can cast their own location spell to find him. Sam is focused on finding the angel that decided to deceive his brother---and to take over his body to commit horrible crimes.


During the process, we can tell that this is eating at Sam. He is feeling guilty. This is beyond what Gadreel did to Kevin, however. As Castiel extracts the grace, Sam slowly starts to regress both physically and emotionally to where he was during the Trials. During them, he told Dean that he was feeling purified for the first time ever. He had always felt unclean, unworthy. The Trials were meant to redeem him from everything he's done.

And yet he chose to stop. He chose to stop for his brother. For Sam, that choice has led to Kevin's death, to the murder of other angels---and their vessels---and to Abaddon and other demons wreaking chaos and death on others in the world.

 

Even when Castiel wishes to stop, Sam refuses, telling him, “My life's not worth any more than anyone else's -- not yours or Dean's...or Kevin's. Please. Please, help me do one thing right. Keep going.”

It's a heartbreaking moment to witness, and we realize how earth-shattering both his decision to stop the Trials and Dean's decision to allow Gadreel to possess him are for Sam. He sees himself as worthless and a hindrance. Sam sees his being alive costing too high a price.

While we don't get to see Abel's side of the story, we know that what Cain did in order to save his soul meant that many thousands---if not more---died. To send Abel to Heaven, it meant that Cain would have to murder many. It's something we see reflected tragically in Sam's story in season nine. He is alive at the cost of others.

And yet, Castiel points out a truth to Sam. The angel may no longer be human, but this experience has clearly changed him forever. Much like Crowley, this brush with humanity has changed his perspective. The angel isn't as single-minded as he once was. He's not willing to sacrifice someone to justify the ends. The angel we saw frustrated over Sam and Dean trying to save the two little boys in “Mommy Dearest” has been replaced by a much more understanding Castiel.

As Sam's condition worsens, Castiel decides to stop extracting the grace and finishes healing him. They'll have to take their chances on the spell with what they have---but Castiel won't let Sam sacrifice himself to find Gadreel. It's not worth it. They will find another way.

Before the spell can even be tested, the angel tells Sam, “Sam, I want Gadreel to pay as much as you do. But nothing is worth losing you. You know, being human, it didn't just change my view of food. It changed my view of you. I mean, I can relate now to how you feel.” It's a crucial statement that the younger Winchester needed to hear, especially after the crushing weight of his guilt about stopping the Trials----and for the guilt that comes with what Dean chose to do in order to save his life.


Sam rewards Castiel by hugging him, conveying his gratitude with the gesture. It's a start for the healing process---although he still has a long way to go as he rejects Castiel's attempt to reach out to Dean again with a firm, “We got this.”

What makes this introduction of Cain and Abel into the Supernatural mythology so special is the truth it reveals. Throughout season five we're told that Sam and Dean were reflections on earth of Michael and Lucifer in Heaven. They are the older brother obedient to an absent father and a younger brother who rebels. They were meant to end the squabble between the two archangels by allowing each one to possess them and face one another at an appointed time and place---to fight to the death.

Instead, they choose their own path. Dean refuses to say Yes to Michael---even if he teeters on the edge. He will support Sam's decision to say Yes and throw Lucifer back into the Cage. It will cost Sam his life---and over a century of torture in Hell---but it works. They stop the Apocalypse in their own way and lock both Michael and Lucifer in the Cage.

In “First Born,” however, we learn that Lucifer tampered with Cain and Abel's brotherly relationship. We're not told too much here by Cain. We know that Cain killed Abel to save him from Lucifer's evil. It's clear that this violent act was done out of love---and Cain suffered the consequences for it.

But what does this story say about Sam and Dean? What about their brotherly unit?

Sam and Dean are currently estranged. After what has happened with Dean's choice to let in Gadreel and to keep that secret, the brothers have gone their separate ways. Dean chose to banish himself for what he's done while Sam chose to let him go. It will be difficult for them to repair this rift---but not all hope is lost.

Each companion---Crowley and Castiel---that accompanied a Winchester in this episode continued to push them to reach out to the other. Crowley waited until the very end to suggest to Dean that they will “need all the help they can get,” while Castiel prodded Sam several times. And as we watched the brothers react to these hints, we saw them remain the “pig-headed” Winchesters we know and love. Yet, there was obvious pain in both of them at the separation. We could tell that they missed the other---not unlike a phantom limb.

Sam and Dean are struggling to cope with the aftermath of the serpent invading the Garden of their brotherhood, but it is also an opportunity for them to do something Cain and Abel simply couldn't: fix things.

In many ways, they were meant to stop Michael and Lucifer's prize fight. Both of them were archangels---absolute and unwavering in their point of view. Michael saw it as his duty to kill Lucifer for his crime of invading the Garden of Eden and Lucifer saw it as his right to rebel against their Father. Neither would change no matter what was said or done.

But Cain and Abel were human. They were men. They understood, in the aftermath of the expulsion from the Garden, what good and evil were. They could experience everything that humanity had to offer. It meant that they could adapt. Most of all, as humans, they knew what it was to love freely.

It is this that Sam and Dean are meant to reclaim. They weren't born to be Michael and Lucifer's vessels. They weren't born to be puppets in the scheme of the Apocalypse. Sam and Dean were born to reclaim the brotherhood that Cain and Abel had stolen away from them by Lucifer.

They are to do what the first brothers couldn't: take back what it means to be brothers.


Timothy Omundson is best known for his role as Detective Lassiter on Psych. Here, as the fabled Cain, Omundson is an intimidating figure. Even before we're told that's who he is, the opening sequence as he moves through the demons is a terrifying sight to behold. When we first encounter him, he seems rather friendly---except for the deadly tone to his voice and the piercing gaze. There's a deadly grace in the way Omundson carries himself, making Cain a very powerful presence in every scene he appears. While we can tell that he's dangerous---even when he's doing something innocuous like drinking tea or talking about bees---there's sorrow and an odd gentle nature under the surface. Confronted with Dean and Crowley in his home---and with their problem with Abaddon---we can tell that Cain is tired. There's a nonchalant beauty in the way Cain sits as a still figure amidst the carnage being wrought in his home as Dean dispatches the demons. He's unflappable in the face of this violence, and Omundson adds a wry humor to Cain when he delivers the line, “Oh don't mind me. Enjoy yourself.” This may be the Father of Murder, but Omundson makes us feel a deep sympathy for Cain as we learn his story. Not only did he have to choose between two losing choices---either watch your brother become Lucifer's “pet” or kill your brother and take his place---he has had to endure the tragic loss of the only woman he's ever loved. Omundson makes us feel that loss best when we see him at his wife's grave, telling her, “I've tried. I've tried, Colette, to see myself as you did. But I know who I am -- Seen what I am. I know you watch over me still. But I need you to look away now.” The timbre of his voice conveys everything we need to know. As he reenters his home, we can tell that Cain has changed into The Father of Murder once more just by the look on his face. Omundson makes Cain his most frightening here, even if we don't get to see the actual killings beyond the bright red flashes from inside his home. Hopefully we'll see him again---before he calls Dean back to end his life. Omundson was an excellent addition to this week's episode---and to the Supernatural Family.


Mark Sheppard makes Crowley as charming as ever. There's still the lingering near-cure---and perhaps what Kevin's blood did to the demon---evident in the King of Hell in this episode. Sheppard has great chemistry with Ackles throughout, both in comedic and dramatic moments. Part of what makes Crowley such a great character is his expert use of wit, and it's in full force here from his line about “Hunters Hogwarts,” to “You're good, but I'm Crowley.” Crowley isn't just about the tinge of humanity still affecting him---rather we see the King of Hell return to his manipulative form---all hidden under a suave charm. He knows just how to push Dean to do what he wants, and we see Sheppard portray this beautifully---as we watch him taunt Dean at the bar, as he tells Dean about Cain, and as he watches Dean fight the demons. It's so subtle, but we can tell that Crowley knows what makes Dean tick and he uses it to his advantage completely. Sheppard also shows Crowley's fear and reverence for Cain wonderfully. It takes a lot to truly frighten the King of Hell, and here's an intimidating figure that does that. He takes this fear and shows it best, however, when Cain silences Crowley. Sheppard gets a giggle out of us as he makes a gasping expression, almost as if he's afraid he may never speak again. This shines again when we see Crowley cross himself upon seeing Cain's Mark, labeling him the Father of Murder. Sheppard does this gesture with great reverence, setting up Ackles for the punchline. Sheppard has a subtlety that shows well here, too. While Crowley never actually comes out to say that he cares about Dean, Sheppard makes this clear best when we see him address Dean at the end of the episode. The sincerity in his delivery of the line, “Your problem is that nobody hates you more than you do---believe me I've tried,” sums up everything that the King of Hell feels about his current hunting partner. Sheppard's Crowley, much like Collins's Castiel did opposite Padalecki, stands in for the fans when he pushes Dean on “needing all the help we can get,” a not-so-subtle hint that perhaps the elder Winchester ought to reach out to his brother and solve their problems.


Misha Collins shows us that while Castiel may have returned to his angelic form, that taste of humanity is still lingering somewhat. Usually opposite Dean on screen, here we see the angel with Padalecki's Sam. As they determine the next step in finding Gadreel, they are setting up their base in the Bunker---allowing them to interact without interference. The typical endearing awkwardness we've come to expect is front and center once more---particularly when we watch the angel try to enjoy a peanut butter and jelly sandwich only to taste just its “molecules.” We see this best, however, when we see Castiel ask, “Sam, may I ask you a question?” only to be told he has and to ask, “Can I ask you another question?” But Collins makes Castiel connect with Sam---and us---emotionally when we see him try to extract Gadreel's grace. Unlike in the past, we can tell that this bothers Castiel greatly. Collins shows us that Castiel is having a hard time seeing Sam in pain here. It's written all over his face and in the hesitant actions he takes while using the syringe. There's also a new compassion in Castiel conveyed best in soft looks and the gentle voice the angel uses in these scenes. As Sam insists they keep going---even as his body regresses back to its state during the Trials---we see Collins give Castiel's frustration voice. He puts it all into the line, “Why must the Winchesters run towards death?” As he looks away and sees the sandwich from earlier, it triggers the humanity he's experienced, and we see a beautiful moment unfold. Collins makes Castiel gentle and benevolent here---and understanding of why Sam wants to push so far. We can tell this in how he delivers his lines or in how he carries himself. And even though they've failed to extract enough grace, Castiel tells Sam what he needs to hear about finding Gadreel another way. As Sam hugs Castiel, Collins shows the angel's befuddlement and awkward nature best in the hesitant returning of the hug. What's so funny about a lot of their exchanges is how they've made Collins, much like Sheppard, the voice for the fans. He tries again and again to convince Sam to reach out to his brother---but he does so in a way that makes it gentle, as if he's planting the seed into Sam's mind rather than commanding him. Collins and Padalecki shared great chemistry in this episode and both built that chemistry between their characters well. Perhaps we'll see more of Collins opposite Padalecki going forward!


Jensen Ackles builds on his performance from “Road Trip” beautifully in “First Born.” We can tell, just by how Ackles sits at the bar, that Dean is nearing total rock bottom. It's apparent, in how Dean is indulging in all his vices, that he's about to hit the self-destruct button soon. It doesn't help when Crowley encroaches---but it will give Dean something to do other than wallow. Ackles and Sheppard have great chemistry and it bears both great comedic and dramatic fruit. The humor is dry between them, especially when they're at the lock up or breaking into Cain's house. Ackles really shines best comedically against Sheppard when we see Cain take away Crowley's voice or when Crowley expresses his religious devotion upon seeing the Mark of Cain. Ackles makes Dean boyish when he tells Cain, “Oh, you gotta teach me how to do that. ” We can't help but giggle when he expresses his disbelief at Crowley crossing himself, either. Dramatically, we can sense a lot of tension between the hunter and demon---and Ackles shows us through sheer body language and facial expressions how uncomfortable Dean is with the situation. This shows best in the scenes where they're talking to Tara at her pawn shop----and we can tell that her line, “If your daddy could see you now,” really hits hard just by the crushed facial expression that crosses Dean's face. Ackles puts it all in that expression and he doesn't have to say a single word to convey that pain. We can tell that he wants nothing more than to either stab Crowley in the heart or ditch him in a Devil's Trap---and that shows best when Dean shoves Crowley against the fence and declares, “We are the furthest thing from family. You got that, dickbag?”


But Ackles shines best when Dean's fighting the demons in front of Cain----it's no wonder Crowley sat back and watched! Knowing that Ackles performed his own stunts makes this scene all the more powerful. It's an elegant dance of death as Dean twists and turns using everything and anything at his disposal to kill the demons attacking. He makes Dean a whirlwind, showing off the hunter's skill and making it seem effortless in the sequence. Even when Dean gets knocked aside or pinned, Ackles shows us the hunter's focus and fury all by action and facial expression. The way Dean shoves the last body onto the floor is the punctuation mark to the deadly dance. Ackles made this violent scene beautiful---all by how he executed the stunts that put it together.


Jared Padalecki presented us with an emotionally drained Sam. Fresh off the reveal that Dean had lied to him---and consequently had an angel possess him---we see Sam struggle to cope with his brother leaving. Padalecki shows us Sam's hurt well---especially in how he tenses up whenever Castiel suggests that they call Dean. There's an exasperated patience in Sam, too, when he's faced with some of the angel's quirks without his brother as buffer. It sets up for great subtle comedy between Padalecki and Collins---particularly in how Sam gently tells Castiel, “Me, Cas. I'm the guinea pig,” or “You just did,”or “Well, technically, you -- yeah, go ahead. What's up ” but it hits us with both laughter and tears when Sam tells Castiel, “Now's the part where you hug back. ” Padalecki shreds our hearts, however, when we see him push himself---and Castiel---in order to extract the grace for the location spell. There's deep sorrow and pain in his voice as he delivers the lines, “My life's not worth any more than anyone else's -- not yours or Dean's...or Kevin's. Please. Please, help me do one thing right. Keep going.” Padalecki takes Sam to a dark place here, and as he endures the physical pain of the needle and the extraction, we can see it etched all over his face. There's almost a form of ecstasy in that expression, and Padalecki conveys that Sam feels he is paying his debt here and now by enduring this. We see such hope in Sam's expression when they cast the locator spell only for it to crumble when it fails. Padalecki also makes his whole frame sag, as if defeat is suddenly crushing down upon his broad shoulders---showing us without having to say anything how devastating it is to have not gone far enough. Yet, as we see Castiel tell Sam “you're not worth losing,” Padalecki makes sure to let us see the flicker of hope illuminate his expression, making us hope with him. As he embraces Castiel, we can feel Sam not only taking the forgiveness that the angel is offering---but offer some of his own in return. We haven't seen Padalecki and Collins on screen as a duo very often, but here it worked beautifully, giving Sam and Castiel a chance to build their own friendship. Hopefully we'll get to see more of that going forward.

Best Lines of the Week:

Dean: Oh, you gotta teach me how to do that!

Dean: Really? Now?

Castiel: I miss you, PB&J.

Castiel: You have a guinea pig? Where?

Crowley: This is by far the dumbest idea you've ever had.

Sam: Being human, it means settling your debts.

Crowley: You're good---but I'm Crowley.

Crowley: Your problem is that nobody hates you more than you do.” Check quote

Cain: Since when does the great Dean Winchester ask for help? That doesn’t sound like the man I’ve read about on demon bathroom walls.

Sam: Now's the part where you hug back.

Crowley: Didn't they teach note-taking at Hunters Hogwarts?

Next week we get to welcome back a familiar face: Garth!



Comments  

amyh
# amyh 2014-01-25 15:13
Beautiful revew. Thank you.
amyh
# amyh 2014-01-25 15:13
Beautiful revew. Thank you.
Bloodina
# Bloodina 2014-01-25 16:01
First time writer here so bare with me :). First of all I would like to say that your way of understanding this show its whats making me write here for first time.I simply love your POV.You nail it every time.But..all this story Cain/Abel for me have another twist.
What if Lucy pick up a wrong vessel first time?What if Abel was actually talking to Michael?What if they got it wrong first time?
We have Dean working with demon when he meet Cain but we have also Sam working with angel at the same time.
What if Cain and Abel did the same thing back then just the contrary?
Ivana
# Ivana 2014-01-25 16:01
First time writer here so bare with me :). First of all I would like to say that your way of understanding this show its whats making me write here for first time.I simply love your POV.You nail it every time.But..all this story Cain/Abel for me have another twist.
What if Lucy pick up a wrong vessel first time?What if Abel was actually talking to Michael?What if they got it wrong first time?
We have Dean working with demon when he meet Cain but we have also Sam working with angel at the same time.
What if Cain and Abel did the same thing back then just the contrary?
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 16:16
Quoting amyh:
Beautiful revew. Thank you.


Thanks! I'm glad you found it so.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 16:16
Quote:
Beautiful revew. Thank you.
Thanks! I'm glad you found it so.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 16:22
Quoting Bloodina:
First time writer here so bare with me :). First of all I would like to say that your way of understanding this show its whats making me write here for first time.I simply love your POV.You nail it every time.But..all this story Cain/Abel for me have another twist.
What if Lucy pick up a wrong vessel first time?What if Abel was actually talking to Michael?What if they got it wrong first time?
We have Dean working with demon when he meet Cain but we have also Sam working with angel at the same time.
What if Cain and Abel did the same thing back then just the contrary?


Thanks for the comment!

I'm glad you enjoy my take on the show. I always find my review style to be more orthodox, I guess. I'm never quite sure if people are gonna like it. I'm glad that you do.

I'm not sure about the theory you've proposed, but it is an interesting parallel. Cain was turned into a demon and is now working with Dean---who has been connected to angels---while Sam is working with an angel after being connected to demons for so long.

I don't think Michael would have misled Abel, though. He was far too obedient to his Father for me to think he would be the one to set this trap. It'd be toying and manipulating his Father's favorite creation, something God punished Lucifer for---by having Michael cast Lucifer into the Cage.

I think, rather, we're seeing this happen because after all this time not only are Sam and Dean trying to make this right, but perhaps demons (Cain and Crowley) and an angel (Castiel) are trying to also fix what went wrong, too. It's just a thought. I'm not sure.

As we go deeper into the season, perhaps we'll see how they unfold that aspect.

Thanks again and I hope you'll continue to read/comment!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 16:22
Quote:
First time writer here so bare with me :). First of all I would like to say that your way of understanding this show its whats making me write here for first time.I simply love your POV.You nail it every time.But..all this story Cain/Abel for me have another twist.
What if Lucy pick up a wrong vessel first time?What if Abel was actually talking to Michael?What if they got it wrong first time?
We have Dean working with demon when he meet Cain but we have also Sam working with angel at the same time.
What if Cain and Abel did the same thing back then just the contrary?
Thanks for the comment!

I'm glad you enjoy my take on the show. I always find my review style to be more orthodox, I guess. I'm never quite sure if people are gonna like it. I'm glad that you do.

I'm not sure about the theory you've proposed, but it is an interesting parallel. Cain was turned into a demon and is now working with Dean---who has been connected to angels---while Sam is working with an angel after being connected to demons for so long.

I don't think Michael would have misled Abel, though. He was far too obedient to his Father for me to think he would be the one to set this trap. It'd be toying and manipulating his Father's favorite creation, something God punished Lucifer for---by having Michael cast Lucifer into the Cage.

I think, rather, we're seeing this happen because after all this time not only are Sam and Dean trying to make this right, but perhaps demons (Cain and Crowley) and an angel (Castiel) are trying to also fix what went wrong, too. It's just a thought. I'm not sure.

As we go deeper into the season, perhaps we'll see how they unfold that aspect.

Thanks again and I hope you'll continue to read/comment!
Bloodina
# Bloodina 2014-01-25 16:38
Thank you for your post and to be honest i adore your orthodox view of the show cos thats kind of my own view that got me to live this show not just to watch it.NO im not not fan that live it in matrially im living it by questionly.If thats a word anyway.Im not native english so sorry for wrong words in right place.

With a theory of Michael I didnt meant that he went against God what i wanted to ask myself after your article is:"What if Cain got it all wrong and made decision on his own about his brother w/o asking him?"Sounds familiar?We,aft er all, did only hear his side of the story.
Ivana
# Ivana 2014-01-25 16:38
Thank you for your post and to be honest i adore your orthodox view of the show cos thats kind of my own view that got me to live this show not just to watch it.NO im not not fan that live it in matrially im living it by questionly.If thats a word anyway.Im not native english so sorry for wrong words in right place.

With a theory of Michael I didnt meant that he went against God what i wanted to ask myself after your article is:"What if Cain got it all wrong and made decision on his own about his brother w/o asking him?"Sounds familiar?We,aft er all, did only hear his side of the story.
Trucklady
# Trucklady 2014-01-25 16:54
Wonderful and touching review Allison! I love your reviews and look forward to reading anything that you write on this site. You captured every feel at every scene for one of the best episodes this season. My favorites are always Dean related and this time it was the fight scene. Man did he kick some demon ass or what? It was helpful knowing that he did all his own stunts and actually spent over 9 hours shooting that one little less-than-5-min ute scene. He did mention in a recent convention that he had taken Dean to a very dark place this season and it was and has been very trying on him but oh so worth every second of airtime. Thanks again Allison!
Trucklady
# Trucklady 2014-01-25 16:54
Wonderful and touching review Allison! I love your reviews and look forward to reading anything that you write on this site. You captured every feel at every scene for one of the best episodes this season. My favorites are always Dean related and this time it was the fight scene. Man did he kick some demon ass or what? It was helpful knowing that he did all his own stunts and actually spent over 9 hours shooting that one little less-than-5-min ute scene. He did mention in a recent convention that he had taken Dean to a very dark place this season and it was and has been very trying on him but oh so worth every second of airtime. Thanks again Allison!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 17:41
Quoting Bloodina:
Thank you for your post and to be honest i adore your orthodox view of the show cos thats kind of my own view that got me to live this show not just to watch it.NO im not not fan that live it in matrially im living it by questionly.If thats a word anyway.Im not native english so sorry for wrong words in right place.

With a theory of Michael I didnt meant that he went against God what i wanted to ask myself after your article is:"What if Cain got it all wrong and made decision on his own about his brother w/o asking him?"Sounds familiar?We,after all, did only hear his side of the story.


Thanks. I'm glad I can help you appreciate the show all the more.

It's possible that Cain didn't discuss this situation with Abel. We're not told that bit of information, no. It really wouldn't surprise me if Cain took action on his own, as we've seen Dean do in the past. It would fit in the show's fabric well, too. I wonder if we'll get any answer to that as we go forward. Now that Dean and Cain are connected, it's possible we may see that detail discussed later on.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 17:41
Quote:
Thank you for your post and to be honest i adore your orthodox view of the show cos thats kind of my own view that got me to live this show not just to watch it.NO im not not fan that live it in matrially im living it by questionly.If thats a word anyway.Im not native english so sorry for wrong words in right place.

With a theory of Michael I didnt meant that he went against God what i wanted to ask myself after your article is:"What if Cain got it all wrong and made decision on his own about his brother w/o asking him?"Sounds familiar?We,after all, did only hear his side of the story.
Thanks. I'm glad I can help you appreciate the show all the more.

It's possible that Cain didn't discuss this situation with Abel. We're not told that bit of information, no. It really wouldn't surprise me if Cain took action on his own, as we've seen Dean do in the past. It would fit in the show's fabric well, too. I wonder if we'll get any answer to that as we go forward. Now that Dean and Cain are connected, it's possible we may see that detail discussed later on.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 17:43
Quoting Trucklady:
Wonderful and touching review Allison! I love your reviews and look forward to reading anything that you write on this site. You captured every feel at every scene for one of the best episodes this season. My favorites are always Dean related and this time it was the fight scene. Man did he kick some demon ass or what? It was helpful knowing that he did all his own stunts and actually spent over 9 hours shooting that one little less-than-5-minute scene. He did mention in a recent convention that he had taken Dean to a very dark place this season and it was and has been very trying on him but oh so worth every second of airtime. Thanks again Allison!


Thanks so much for the comment.

I'm glad you like my take on this particular episode and in my other pieces.

That scene took 9 hours to film? I'm not entirely surprised, I guess. I think it's awesome that everyone on SPN seems to be so committed to doing things like this. Jensen made that fight scene look like art. Just beautiful. I also think we're gonna see Dean going down even darker paths than we've seen before, and I think that makes for great drama.

Thanks again for reading and commenting!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 17:43
Quote:
Wonderful and touching review Allison! I love your reviews and look forward to reading anything that you write on this site. You captured every feel at every scene for one of the best episodes this season. My favorites are always Dean related and this time it was the fight scene. Man did he kick some demon ass or what? It was helpful knowing that he did all his own stunts and actually spent over 9 hours shooting that one little less-than-5-minute scene. He did mention in a recent convention that he had taken Dean to a very dark place this season and it was and has been very trying on him but oh so worth every second of airtime. Thanks again Allison!
Thanks so much for the comment.

I'm glad you like my take on this particular episode and in my other pieces.

That scene took 9 hours to film? I'm not entirely surprised, I guess. I think it's awesome that everyone on SPN seems to be so committed to doing things like this. Jensen made that fight scene look like art. Just beautiful. I also think we're gonna see Dean going down even darker paths than we've seen before, and I think that makes for great drama.

Thanks again for reading and commenting!
Abby S
# Abby S 2014-01-25 17:47
Awesome review!!
These last two episodes have been some the best ever!
Question: When Crowley said, "your problem is that nobody hates you more than you do, trust me I've tried", he meant that he has tried to hate Dean more than Dean hates himself, right? Crowley doesn't hate Dean, he's just a evil demonic bastard that has killed many people that he Winchesters have saved, tried to save and that the Winchesters have loved?

Just want to say that Missouri was an interesting choice to place Cain. John Winchester when to the Psychic Missouri for answers... a shout out to Psych?

When Dean picked up that towel, was I the only one that said "Jason Bourne" out loud? Anyone?

Again, awesome review! I love where the story is going and can't wait to see it unfold.
Abby S
# Abby S 2014-01-25 17:47
Awesome review!!
These last two episodes have been some the best ever!
Question: When Crowley said, "your problem is that nobody hates you more than you do, trust me I've tried", he meant that he has tried to hate Dean more than Dean hates himself, right? Crowley doesn't hate Dean, he's just a evil demonic bastard that has killed many people that he Winchesters have saved, tried to save and that the Winchesters have loved?

Just want to say that Missouri was an interesting choice to place Cain. John Winchester when to the Psychic Missouri for answers... a shout out to Psych?

When Dean picked up that towel, was I the only one that said "Jason Bourne" out loud? Anyone?

Again, awesome review! I love where the story is going and can't wait to see it unfold.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 19:00
Quoting Abby S:
Awesome review!!
These last two episodes have been some the best ever!
Question: When Crowley said, "your problem is that nobody hates you more than you do, trust me I've tried", he meant that he has tried to hate Dean more than Dean hates himself, right? Crowley doesn't hate Dean, he's just a evil demonic bastard that has killed many people that he Winchesters have saved, tried to save and that the Winchesters have loved?

Just want to say that Missouri was an interesting choice to place Cain. John Winchester when to the Psychic Missouri for answers... a shout out to Psych?

When Dean picked up that towel, was I the only one that said "Jason Bourne" out loud? Anyone?

Again, awesome review! I love where the story is going and can't wait to see it unfold.


Thanks for the comment.

I think Crowley has hated Dean in the past, honestly. The Winchesters stand in the way of his plans quite often, and he probably has hated Sam and Dean several times since he became the King of Hell.

I think, however, when he expresses this to Dean here, it's another key example that what Sam did to him during the Trials and what injections of Kevin's blood is affecting him in ways I don't think even he understands. Do I think he hates the brothers now? No. I think he's not quite sure how he feels. He's leaning more and more towards caring about them both as individuals and as a single unit. I'm curious to see how long that'll last and how it'll evolve as we go further into the season.

I thought of the same thing when I saw they were heading to Missouri. It's funny how that got subtly inserted into the episode.

Thanks again for the great comment!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 19:00
Quote:
Awesome review!!
These last two episodes have been some the best ever!
Question: When Crowley said, "your problem is that nobody hates you more than you do, trust me I've tried", he meant that he has tried to hate Dean more than Dean hates himself, right? Crowley doesn't hate Dean, he's just a evil demonic bastard that has killed many people that he Winchesters have saved, tried to save and that the Winchesters have loved?

Just want to say that Missouri was an interesting choice to place Cain. John Winchester when to the Psychic Missouri for answers... a shout out to Psych?

When Dean picked up that towel, was I the only one that said "Jason Bourne" out loud? Anyone?

Again, awesome review! I love where the story is going and can't wait to see it unfold.
Thanks for the comment.

I think Crowley has hated Dean in the past, honestly. The Winchesters stand in the way of his plans quite often, and he probably has hated Sam and Dean several times since he became the King of Hell.

I think, however, when he expresses this to Dean here, it's another key example that what Sam did to him during the Trials and what injections of Kevin's blood is affecting him in ways I don't think even he understands. Do I think he hates the brothers now? No. I think he's not quite sure how he feels. He's leaning more and more towards caring about them both as individuals and as a single unit. I'm curious to see how long that'll last and how it'll evolve as we go further into the season.

I thought of the same thing when I saw they were heading to Missouri. It's funny how that got subtly inserted into the episode.

Thanks again for the great comment!
nappi815
# nappi815 2014-01-25 20:17
Thank u for another awesome review. Yours and sweet on deans are, were the ones I looked forward to most. Thankfully I still have yours to look forward to. Though I would like to add that I do enjoy Gerry's reviews too. She is a welcome addition to the . Thanks to all of you.
nappi815
# nappi815 2014-01-25 20:17
Thank u for another awesome review. Yours and sweet on deans are, were the ones I looked forward to most. Thankfully I still have yours to look forward to. Though I would like to add that I do enjoy Gerry's reviews too. She is a welcome addition to the . Thanks to all of you.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 20:48
Quoting nappi815:
Thank u for another awesome review. Yours and sweet on deans are, were the ones I looked forward to most. Thankfully I still have yours to look forward to. Though I would like to add that I do enjoy Gerry's reviews too. She is a welcome addition to the . Thanks to all of you.


Thanks for the great comment.

I'm glad you like my reviews! I'll pass onto Gerry that you like hers as well.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 20:48
Quote:
Thank u for another awesome review. Yours and sweet on deans are, were the ones I looked forward to most. Thankfully I still have yours to look forward to. Though I would like to add that I do enjoy Gerry's reviews too. She is a welcome addition to the . Thanks to all of you.
Thanks for the great comment.

I'm glad you like my reviews! I'll pass onto Gerry that you like hers as well.

Thanks again.
suzee51
# suzee51 2014-01-25 21:46
Far Away Eyes: Thank you for such an insightful review. I wonder if I could ask for your take about two things shown in "First Born"?

Let's start with #1:

What did Crowley mean when he told Dean he was "worthy"?

I mean, remember this is Crowley talking (King of Hell, demon, hello?) and Cain has already said he recognized Dean as "a kindred spirit" because he is a killer, too.

Is "being worthy" in this context a good thing OR a bad thing? Every review I have read claims that they were thrilled to hear someone tell Dean that "he is worthy". What is wrong with me that I didn't take it that way at all!

For me being "worthy" to hold The Mark of Cain is not a blessing or a sign that Dean had earned something good. When I heard Crowley telling Dean he is "worthy", I heard a demon trying to rationalize for a human (just as Ruby did to Sam) that it is OK to accept and use a demon's power. Yes, I am interested in finding out what is entailed in holding The Mark of Cain (immortality? protection from other demons? etc.) but what I am more interested in is seeing the progression of what happens to the Dean we all know and love now that he seems to have started down this dark path that seems to accept and celebrate him as a "killer".

Then there's #2:

Why would a demon for whatever reason ever make the sign of the cross?

The sign of the cross is a visible acknowledgment of the power of the Holy Trinity: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It would seem to be the antithesis of everything that Crowley stands for. I must admit to being totally shocked to see that Crowley could even perform that action - let alone that he willingly performed it on his own.

Can you please shed any light on these two questions I have? THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
suzee51
# suzee51 2014-01-25 21:46
Far Away Eyes: Thank you for such an insightful review. I wonder if I could ask for your take about two things shown in "First Born"?

Let's start with #1:

What did Crowley mean when he told Dean he was "worthy"?

I mean, remember this is Crowley talking (King of Hell, demon, hello?) and Cain has already said he recognized Dean as "a kindred spirit" because he is a killer, too.

Is "being worthy" in this context a good thing OR a bad thing? Every review I have read claims that they were thrilled to hear someone tell Dean that "he is worthy". What is wrong with me that I didn't take it that way at all!

For me being "worthy" to hold The Mark of Cain is not a blessing or a sign that Dean had earned something good. When I heard Crowley telling Dean he is "worthy", I heard a demon trying to rationalize for a human (just as Ruby did to Sam) that it is OK to accept and use a demon's power. Yes, I am interested in finding out what is entailed in holding The Mark of Cain (immortality? protection from other demons? etc.) but what I am more interested in is seeing the progression of what happens to the Dean we all know and love now that he seems to have started down this dark path that seems to accept and celebrate him as a "killer".

Then there's #2:

Why would a demon for whatever reason ever make the sign of the cross?

The sign of the cross is a visible acknowledgment of the power of the Holy Trinity: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It would seem to be the antithesis of everything that Crowley stands for. I must admit to being totally shocked to see that Crowley could even perform that action - let alone that he willingly performed it on his own.

Can you please shed any light on these two questions I have? THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
cheryl42
# cheryl42 2014-01-25 21:49
What a great review. I loved your interpretation of the Cain and Abel story. I feel so much better about where this story might be heading. Your take is by far the best I've read. You and sweetondean (I actually tracked her down) have the most positive outlook on this show. I love it.
cheryl42
# cheryl42 2014-01-25 21:49
What a great review. I loved your interpretation of the Cain and Abel story. I feel so much better about where this story might be heading. Your take is by far the best I've read. You and sweetondean (I actually tracked her down) have the most positive outlook on this show. I love it.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 23:37
Quoting suzee51:
Far Away Eyes: Thank you for such an insightful review. I wonder if I could ask for your take about two things shown in "First Born"?

Let's start with #1:

What did Crowley mean when he told Dean he was "worthy"?

I mean, remember this is Crowley talking (King of Hell, demon, hello?) and Cain has already said he recognized Dean as "a kindred spirit" because he is a killer, too.

Is "being worthy" in this context a good thing OR a bad thing? Every review I have read claims that they were thrilled to hear someone tell Dean that "he is worthy". What is wrong with me that I didn't take it that way at all!

For me being "worthy" to hold The Mark of Cain is not a blessing or a sign that Dean had earned something good. When I heard Crowley telling Dean he is "worthy", I heard a demon trying to rationalize for a human (just as Ruby did to Sam) that it is OK to accept and use a demon's power. Yes, I am interested in finding out what is entailed in holding The Mark of Cain (immortality? protection from other demons? etc.) but what I am more interested in is seeing the progression of what happens to the Dean we all know and love now that he seems to have started down this dark path that seems to accept and celebrate him as a "killer".

Then there's #2:

Why would a demon for whatever reason ever make the sign of the cross?

The sign of the cross is a visible acknowledgment of the power of the Holy Trinity: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It would seem to be the antithesis of everything that Crowley stands for. I must admit to being totally shocked to see that Crowley could even perform that action - let alone that he willingly performed it on his own.

Can you please shed any light on these two questions I have? THANK YOU VERY MUCH.


Thanks for the comment.

As for your first question, I think I'm rather split on the meaning. On one hand, I think Crowley, much as Cas, was a stand in for us, the fan. In many ways I think he was speaking to the fact that Dean is worthy in many ways---good ways. He's a hero. He fights for family. He does whatever it takes to save another's life. All these things make him worthy of not only being considered a good person, but worthy to return back to his brother.

On the other, you're right. Crowley was also speaking to being worthy of Cain's Mark. This means he's an expert killer, someone who can be considered a vicious and cruel monster. This is a dark path we'll be watching Dean embark on. We don't know quite yet what the Mark will do to Dean or what it might mean for him. Crowley is a demon, and so his saying that Dean is worthy of Cain's Mark makes us wonder a bit. Is this truly a good gift? We know that Dean needs it in order to kill Abaddon. But after that? What then? I think we'll be watching that unfold for the remainder of the season.

To your second question, I think Crowley's signing of the Cross is an ironic gesture meant to draw a punchline out of Dean with the "Now? Really?" Outside of Catholicism, this gesture has come to signify that one is terribly frightened of something. It's not necessarily a religious gesture at that point in some ways. Considering that Crowley is Scottish and that he died roughly during the 1640s, that would most likely make him a Protestant when human---if he practiced a Christian faith at all. Presbyterianism is the primary Protestant sect in Scotland, especially at that time. They don't do this gesture.

I'm not sure that it meant anything else than irony---a demon calling on the intercession of the Holy Trinity is funny, after all.

I hope that these answers help on some level.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 23:37
Quote:
Far Away Eyes: Thank you for such an insightful review. I wonder if I could ask for your take about two things shown in "First Born"?

Let's start with #1:

What did Crowley mean when he told Dean he was "worthy"?

I mean, remember this is Crowley talking (King of Hell, demon, hello?) and Cain has already said he recognized Dean as "a kindred spirit" because he is a killer, too.

Is "being worthy" in this context a good thing OR a bad thing? Every review I have read claims that they were thrilled to hear someone tell Dean that "he is worthy". What is wrong with me that I didn't take it that way at all!

For me being "worthy" to hold The Mark of Cain is not a blessing or a sign that Dean had earned something good. When I heard Crowley telling Dean he is "worthy", I heard a demon trying to rationalize for a human (just as Ruby did to Sam) that it is OK to accept and use a demon's power. Yes, I am interested in finding out what is entailed in holding The Mark of Cain (immortality? protection from other demons? etc.) but what I am more interested in is seeing the progression of what happens to the Dean we all know and love now that he seems to have started down this dark path that seems to accept and celebrate him as a "killer".

Then there's #2:

Why would a demon for whatever reason ever make the sign of the cross?

The sign of the cross is a visible acknowledgment of the power of the Holy Trinity: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It would seem to be the antithesis of everything that Crowley stands for. I must admit to being totally shocked to see that Crowley could even perform that action - let alone that he willingly performed it on his own.

Can you please shed any light on these two questions I have? THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
Thanks for the comment.

As for your first question, I think I'm rather split on the meaning. On one hand, I think Crowley, much as Cas, was a stand in for us, the fan. In many ways I think he was speaking to the fact that Dean is worthy in many ways---good ways. He's a hero. He fights for family. He does whatever it takes to save another's life. All these things make him worthy of not only being considered a good person, but worthy to return back to his brother.

On the other, you're right. Crowley was also speaking to being worthy of Cain's Mark. This means he's an expert killer, someone who can be considered a vicious and cruel monster. This is a dark path we'll be watching Dean embark on. We don't know quite yet what the Mark will do to Dean or what it might mean for him. Crowley is a demon, and so his saying that Dean is worthy of Cain's Mark makes us wonder a bit. Is this truly a good gift? We know that Dean needs it in order to kill Abaddon. But after that? What then? I think we'll be watching that unfold for the remainder of the season.

To your second question, I think Crowley's signing of the Cross is an ironic gesture meant to draw a punchline out of Dean with the "Now? Really?" Outside of Catholicism, this gesture has come to signify that one is terribly frightened of something. It's not necessarily a religious gesture at that point in some ways. Considering that Crowley is Scottish and that he died roughly during the 1640s, that would most likely make him a Protestant when human---if he practiced a Christian faith at all. Presbyterianism is the primary Protestant sect in Scotland, especially at that time. They don't do this gesture.

I'm not sure that it meant anything else than irony---a demon calling on the intercession of the Holy Trinity is funny, after all.

I hope that these answers help on some level.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 23:39
Quoting cheryl42:
What a great review. I loved your interpretation of the Cain and Abel story. I feel so much better about where this story might be heading. Your take is by far the best I've read. You and sweetondean (I actually tracked her down) have the most positive outlook on this show. I love it.


Thanks for the great comment.

I'm glad you liked my take on Cain and Abel and their relation to Sam and Dean. It just seemed to make sense to me the more I thought about it.

I'm glad you found SweetonDean and that you enjoy my reviews.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-25 23:39
Quote:
What a great review. I loved your interpretation of the Cain and Abel story. I feel so much better about where this story might be heading. Your take is by far the best I've read. You and sweetondean (I actually tracked her down) have the most positive outlook on this show. I love it.
Thanks for the great comment.

I'm glad you liked my take on Cain and Abel and their relation to Sam and Dean. It just seemed to make sense to me the more I thought about it.

I'm glad you found SweetonDean and that you enjoy my reviews.

Thanks again!
lkeke35
# lkeke35 2014-01-26 03:14
Oh this was a wonderful review. I really enjoyed it and looking forward to more.

First off, thank you for illuminating Dean's and Sam's mindset. This episode was so well written. Your review brought up so many parallels and call backs to things that happened in the first five season. I was totally flashbacking with this review.

As for Dean saving Sam, he has always cconsidered himself a failure for not saving him. Its why he tries so hard and makes such reckless decisions and this does go back to father issues and Johns first real commandment to him -take your brother outside. It was Auschwitz an incredibly traumatic and pivotal moment in his life and hes been relieving that moment ever since. In a way Dean is stuck in that moment emotionally. He is forever carrying his brother out of a burning house. To fail at doing that means his death.
Also when given a choice between a bad de vision and a worse decision, Dean will choose what he thinks is the lesser of two evils. And in his mind, the greater evil will always be failing to save Sam. So, I don't see it as unwillingness to let go. He can let go. Its failure that is his personal demon.

As far as Dean being a killer, I never took that to mean he was monstrous or cruel. I see it as meaning that's where and who he is. Dean is at peace when he is fighting. Its what he does. Fighting is as much a part of him as his hair and eye Color. He is a born leader who thinks strategically in the moment and knows his truest sense of peace when he is in that moment. He forgets himself. He is pure. Its the reason he flourished so well in Purgatory. He doesn't love killing. It is fighting that makes him feel complete /whole. Just Imo, though.

I think Crowley really does like him. I think he admires him as well. I think they only time hes ever truly hurt them is when they were a hindrance to his plans. Otherwise his attitude towards them is use them or live and let live.

Any way this review really makes me admire the writers quite a bit for what they accomplished here.

(I'm sure there's typos here because my Kindle Bates me. Please forgive!)
lkeke35
# lkeke35 2014-01-26 03:14
Oh this was a wonderful review. I really enjoyed it and looking forward to more.

First off, thank you for illuminating Dean's and Sam's mindset. This episode was so well written. Your review brought up so many parallels and call backs to things that happened in the first five season. I was totally flashbacking with this review.

As for Dean saving Sam, he has always cconsidered himself a failure for not saving him. Its why he tries so hard and makes such reckless decisions and this does go back to father issues and Johns first real commandment to him -take your brother outside. It was Auschwitz an incredibly traumatic and pivotal moment in his life and hes been relieving that moment ever since. In a way Dean is stuck in that moment emotionally. He is forever carrying his brother out of a burning house. To fail at doing that means his death.
Also when given a choice between a bad de vision and a worse decision, Dean will choose what he thinks is the lesser of two evils. And in his mind, the greater evil will always be failing to save Sam. So, I don't see it as unwillingness to let go. He can let go. Its failure that is his personal demon.

As far as Dean being a killer, I never took that to mean he was monstrous or cruel. I see it as meaning that's where and who he is. Dean is at peace when he is fighting. Its what he does. Fighting is as much a part of him as his hair and eye Color. He is a born leader who thinks strategically in the moment and knows his truest sense of peace when he is in that moment. He forgets himself. He is pure. Its the reason he flourished so well in Purgatory. He doesn't love killing. It is fighting that makes him feel complete /whole. Just Imo, though.

I think Crowley really does like him. I think he admires him as well. I think they only time hes ever truly hurt them is when they were a hindrance to his plans. Otherwise his attitude towards them is use them or live and let live.

Any way this review really makes me admire the writers quite a bit for what they accomplished here.

(I'm sure there's typos here because my Kindle Bates me. Please forgive!)
lkeke35
# lkeke35 2014-01-26 03:18
See that's what I mean. My Kindle hates me and uses autocorrect to make me look like a crazy -woman.
lkeke35
# lkeke35 2014-01-26 03:18
See that's what I mean. My Kindle hates me and uses autocorrect to make me look like a crazy -woman.
E
# E 2014-01-26 08:10
This a wonderful review, very detailed and informative! As a matter of fact, I think that you flesh out the Sam/Abel perspective far better than the actual episode did. I have been a pretty big fan of the way in which Supernatural uses and manipulates conventional religion to flesh out the world within the show for the most part. But my defensive inner Sam Girl can't help but notice that the spin that they've taken with the Cain and Abel story here doesn't do Sam any favors as a character. I love what it's doing for Dean, it has been crafted to meld in perfectly with what we know and admire about Dean and what we would expect him to do, everything seems very consistent and honest. But what does this interpretation do for Sam? The primary problem that I have with the episode is that once again, there is a great deal of detail about Cain/Dean, but very little about Sam/Abel; TPTB have drawn the parallel but we've only had half of the story. The Cain story has been altered to show Cain (and by extension Dean) in a very favorable and heroic light. He is willing to give up everything, endure eternal hell on earth and being labeled the villain for all eternity for the sake of his beloved brother. We've seen this trope so many times this season that I am looking for anvils to begin dropping from the sky; and I don't have a problem with this alteration as it concerns Dean; he IS a hero, he WILL do anything to save Sam. But where does Sam fit into this? Is he going to continue to be the brother who makes the wrong decisions? Who needs saving? Who's choices cause never ending pain to everyone? We've seen this…and I wan't more for Sam than a re-tread of this tired out old story. He deserves better and he deserves the character development that comes with learning from your mistakes.

So, what about the Abel and Sam connection? What does the story the show is constructing say about them as characters and as heroes? As it currently stands, the Cain/Abel mythology shows only that Abel was foolish and allowed his deeds to subject his brother to never ending torment. He was tricked or duped into courting evil, and he needed his older brother to save him because he's always making the wrong decisions. He gets to rejoice in heaven while his brother is tormented in hell. It's hardly a heroic character profile they're building, and since we haven't heard from Abel himself we can't even know if this is even the whole story. And this may not be true of Sam either, but the show is drawing the parallel, and without any information from Sam himself, all we can do as viewer is accept the parallel that is being shown to us. We only know about Abel through Cain and we only know about Sam through Dean, or in the case of this particular episode, through Castiel, because even though we were supposed to be learning about Sam in the B plot, he didn't really say much, and Castiel did all that talking. I am hoping that there is more to this story then the current subtext is suggesting; Cain/Dean is heroic, misunderstood and will be punished for his good deeds and that Sam/Abel is easily lead astray and his transgressions will cause unending pain for his older brother for all eternity.

In general, I love Robbie Thompson's episodes, but he's not great at writing Sam, and this episode is no exception. The connection between Cain and Dean is obvious and rich in detail with the alterations to the Cain and Abel storyline manipulated to show Dean in his best and most heroic light and in a way that is honest and consistent with the show's canon. But there is currently very little to connect Sam to Abel that was explored in this episode that was meaningful or insightful in any way and the little bit of connection that was made is distinctly unflattering to Sam as a character. I realize that I am probably jumping the gun here and that more detail is on it's way. I can only hope that this episode is only a preliminary installment of a story that fleshes out BOTH sides of the story to include detail for both brothers to be heroes.
E
# E 2014-01-26 08:10
This a wonderful review, very detailed and informative! As a matter of fact, I think that you flesh out the Sam/Abel perspective far better than the actual episode did. I have been a pretty big fan of the way in which Supernatural uses and manipulates conventional religion to flesh out the world within the show for the most part. But my defensive inner Sam Girl can't help but notice that the spin that they've taken with the Cain and Abel story here doesn't do Sam any favors as a character. I love what it's doing for Dean, it has been crafted to meld in perfectly with what we know and admire about Dean and what we would expect him to do, everything seems very consistent and honest. But what does this interpretation do for Sam? The primary problem that I have with the episode is that once again, there is a great deal of detail about Cain/Dean, but very little about Sam/Abel; TPTB have drawn the parallel but we've only had half of the story. The Cain story has been altered to show Cain (and by extension Dean) in a very favorable and heroic light. He is willing to give up everything, endure eternal hell on earth and being labeled the villain for all eternity for the sake of his beloved brother. We've seen this trope so many times this season that I am looking for anvils to begin dropping from the sky; and I don't have a problem with this alteration as it concerns Dean; he IS a hero, he WILL do anything to save Sam. But where does Sam fit into this? Is he going to continue to be the brother who makes the wrong decisions? Who needs saving? Who's choices cause never ending pain to everyone? We've seen this…and I wan't more for Sam than a re-tread of this tired out old story. He deserves better and he deserves the character development that comes with learning from your mistakes.

So, what about the Abel and Sam connection? What does the story the show is constructing say about them as characters and as heroes? As it currently stands, the Cain/Abel mythology shows only that Abel was foolish and allowed his deeds to subject his brother to never ending torment. He was tricked or duped into courting evil, and he needed his older brother to save him because he's always making the wrong decisions. He gets to rejoice in heaven while his brother is tormented in hell. It's hardly a heroic character profile they're building, and since we haven't heard from Abel himself we can't even know if this is even the whole story. And this may not be true of Sam either, but the show is drawing the parallel, and without any information from Sam himself, all we can do as viewer is accept the parallel that is being shown to us. We only know about Abel through Cain and we only know about Sam through Dean, or in the case of this particular episode, through Castiel, because even though we were supposed to be learning about Sam in the B plot, he didn't really say much, and Castiel did all that talking. I am hoping that there is more to this story then the current subtext is suggesting; Cain/Dean is heroic, misunderstood and will be punished for his good deeds and that Sam/Abel is easily lead astray and his transgressions will cause unending pain for his older brother for all eternity.

In general, I love Robbie Thompson's episodes, but he's not great at writing Sam, and this episode is no exception. The connection between Cain and Dean is obvious and rich in detail with the alterations to the Cain and Abel storyline manipulated to show Dean in his best and most heroic light and in a way that is honest and consistent with the show's canon. But there is currently very little to connect Sam to Abel that was explored in this episode that was meaningful or insightful in any way and the little bit of connection that was made is distinctly unflattering to Sam as a character. I realize that I am probably jumping the gun here and that more detail is on it's way. I can only hope that this episode is only a preliminary installment of a story that fleshes out BOTH sides of the story to include detail for both brothers to be heroes.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 10:52
Quoting lkeke35:
Oh this was a wonderful review. I really enjoyed it and looking forward to more.

First off, thank you for illuminating Dean's and Sam's mindset. This episode was so well written. Your review brought up so many parallels and call backs to things that happened in the first five season. I was totally flashbacking with this review.

As for Dean saving Sam, he has always cconsidered himself a failure for not saving him. Its why he tries so hard and makes such reckless decisions and this does go back to father issues and Johns first real commandment to him -take your brother outside. It was Auschwitz an incredibly traumatic and pivotal moment in his life and hes been relieving that moment ever since. In a way Dean is stuck in that moment emotionally. He is forever carrying his brother out of a burning house. To fail at doing that means his death.
Also when given a choice between a bad de vision and a worse decision, Dean will choose what he thinks is the lesser of two evils. And in his mind, the greater evil will always be failing to save Sam. So, I don't see it as unwillingness to let go. He can let go. Its failure that is his personal demon.

As far as Dean being a killer, I never took that to mean he was monstrous or cruel. I see it as meaning that's where and who he is. Dean is at peace when he is fighting. Its what he does. Fighting is as much a part of him as his hair and eye Color. He is a born leader who thinks strategically in the moment and knows his truest sense of peace when he is in that moment. He forgets himself. He is pure. Its the reason he flourished so well in Purgatory. He doesn't love killing. It is fighting that makes him feel complete /whole. Just Imo, though.

I think Crowley really does like him. I think he admires him as well. I think they only time hes ever truly hurt them is when they were a hindrance to his plans. Otherwise his attitude towards them is use them or live and let live.

Any way this review really makes me admire the writers quite a bit for what they accomplished here.

(I'm sure there's typos here because my Kindle Bates me. Please forgive!)


Thanks for the comment!

I think you're right. Dean has been accused of being unable to let go, but I think you're much closer to the truth on this matter. Dean is forever hauling his little brother as a baby from the burning house. So when he sees his brother in danger in any way, it makes him do things to prevent harm/death to Sam. It's just who he is.

I have to also agree with the assessment that Dean flourished in Purgatory not because he's all about the killing as much as he is about the fighting. It's a dance to him, something that he can do without having to think about it because his body will flow into that mode with ease. It's an automatic thing. It's what we saw in Cain's cabin.

As for Crowley, yes, we've only really seen him go after the brothers when they're hindering things like finding Purgatory or closing the Gates of Hell. He has no problem aiding them or even stepping out of the way as he did when the Winchesters were fighting Dick Roman. If he sees an opportunity to do something in his interests that counters a Winchester's goal, though, he has no qualms about turning coat. It's just who he is. But I do think, especially after what he did for Sam in getting rid of Gadreel that he does care for both of them.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 10:52
Quote:
Oh this was a wonderful review. I really enjoyed it and looking forward to more.

First off, thank you for illuminating Dean's and Sam's mindset. This episode was so well written. Your review brought up so many parallels and call backs to things that happened in the first five season. I was totally flashbacking with this review.

As for Dean saving Sam, he has always cconsidered himself a failure for not saving him. Its why he tries so hard and makes such reckless decisions and this does go back to father issues and Johns first real commandment to him -take your brother outside. It was Auschwitz an incredibly traumatic and pivotal moment in his life and hes been relieving that moment ever since. In a way Dean is stuck in that moment emotionally. He is forever carrying his brother out of a burning house. To fail at doing that means his death.
Also when given a choice between a bad de vision and a worse decision, Dean will choose what he thinks is the lesser of two evils. And in his mind, the greater evil will always be failing to save Sam. So, I don't see it as unwillingness to let go. He can let go. Its failure that is his personal demon.

As far as Dean being a killer, I never took that to mean he was monstrous or cruel. I see it as meaning that's where and who he is. Dean is at peace when he is fighting. Its what he does. Fighting is as much a part of him as his hair and eye Color. He is a born leader who thinks strategically in the moment and knows his truest sense of peace when he is in that moment. He forgets himself. He is pure. Its the reason he flourished so well in Purgatory. He doesn't love killing. It is fighting that makes him feel complete /whole. Just Imo, though.

I think Crowley really does like him. I think he admires him as well. I think they only time hes ever truly hurt them is when they were a hindrance to his plans. Otherwise his attitude towards them is use them or live and let live.

Any way this review really makes me admire the writers quite a bit for what they accomplished here.

(I'm sure there's typos here because my Kindle Bates me. Please forgive!)
Thanks for the comment!

I think you're right. Dean has been accused of being unable to let go, but I think you're much closer to the truth on this matter. Dean is forever hauling his little brother as a baby from the burning house. So when he sees his brother in danger in any way, it makes him do things to prevent harm/death to Sam. It's just who he is.

I have to also agree with the assessment that Dean flourished in Purgatory not because he's all about the killing as much as he is about the fighting. It's a dance to him, something that he can do without having to think about it because his body will flow into that mode with ease. It's an automatic thing. It's what we saw in Cain's cabin.

As for Crowley, yes, we've only really seen him go after the brothers when they're hindering things like finding Purgatory or closing the Gates of Hell. He has no problem aiding them or even stepping out of the way as he did when the Winchesters were fighting Dick Roman. If he sees an opportunity to do something in his interests that counters a Winchester's goal, though, he has no qualms about turning coat. It's just who he is. But I do think, especially after what he did for Sam in getting rid of Gadreel that he does care for both of them.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 11:27
Quoting E:
This a wonderful review, very detailed and informative! As a matter of fact, I think that you flesh out the Sam/Abel perspective far better than the actual episode did. I have been a pretty big fan of the way in which Supernatural uses and manipulates conventional religion to flesh out the world within the show for the most part. But my defensive inner Sam Girl can't help but notice that the spin that they've taken with the Cain and Abel story here doesn't do Sam any favors as a character. I love what it's doing for Dean, it has been crafted to meld in perfectly with what we know and admire about Dean and what we would expect him to do, everything seems very consistent and honest. But what does this interpretation do for Sam? The primary problem that I have with the episode is that once again, there is a great deal of detail about Cain/Dean, but very little about Sam/Abel; TPTB have drawn the parallel but we've only had half of the story. The Cain story has been altered to show Cain (and by extension Dean) in a very favorable and heroic light. He is willing to give up everything, endure eternal hell on earth and being labeled the villain for all eternity for the sake of his beloved brother. We've seen this trope so many times this season that I am looking for anvils to begin dropping from the sky; and I don't have a problem with this alteration as it concerns Dean; he IS a hero, he WILL do anything to save Sam. But where does Sam fit into this? Is he going to continue to be the brother who makes the wrong decisions? Who needs saving? Who's choices cause never ending pain to everyone? We've seen this…and I wan't more for Sam than a re-tread of this tired out old story. He deserves better and he deserves the character development that comes with learning from your mistakes.

So, what about the Abel and Sam connection? What does the story the show is constructing say about them as characters and as heroes? As it currently stands, the Cain/Abel mythology shows only that Abel was foolish and allowed his deeds to subject his brother to never ending torment. He was tricked or duped into courting evil, and he needed his older brother to save him because he's always making the wrong decisions. He gets to rejoice in heaven while his brother is tormented in hell. It's hardly a heroic character profile they're building, and since we haven't heard from Abel himself we can't even know if this is even the whole story. And this may not be true of Sam either, but the show is drawing the parallel, and without any information from Sam himself, all we can do as viewer is accept the parallel that is being shown to us. We only know about Abel through Cain and we only know about Sam through Dean, or in the case of this particular episode, through Castiel, because even though we were supposed to be learning about Sam in the B plot, he didn't really say much, and Castiel did all that talking. I am hoping that there is more to this story then the current subtext is suggesting; Cain/Dean is heroic, misunderstood and will be punished for his good deeds and that Sam/Abel is easily lead astray and his transgressions will cause unending pain for his older brother for all eternity.

In general, I love Robbie Thompson's episodes, but he's not great at writing Sam, and this episode is no exception. The connection between Cain and Dean is obvious and rich in detail with the alterations to the Cain and Abel storyline manipulated to show Dean in his best and most heroic light and in a way that is honest and consistent with the show's canon. But there is currently very little to connect Sam to Abel that was explored in this episode that was meaningful or insightful in any way and the little bit of connection that was made is distinctly unflattering to Sam as a character. I realize that I am probably jumping the gun here and that more detail is on it's way. I can only hope that this episode is only a preliminary installment of a story that fleshes out BOTH sides of the story to include detail for both brothers to be heroes.


Thanks for the comment.

I found the introduction of the Cain and Abel story to signify that Sam and Dean could do something that those brothers could not. We certainly are not told much either Biblically or in Cain's telling of what happened what Abel was feeling/doing exactly, but I think as we go forward and this becomes more of a construct for the show, we may learn more. I think, in the scheme of introducing the new myharc focusing on Dean they had this portion of the story focus on him for now.

In regards to Sam's story, I felt that a lot his words and actions were his way of taking back his body, his mind, and his life. He chose to undergo the extraction so that he could find Gadreel so that he could confront the angel that duped Dean into possessing him. Castiel was against these actions, and yet Sam overruled him at almost every turn. Sam was also owning up to mistakes he made, which is a part of who he is. But he also needs to learn that he can't allow guilt to consume nor destroy him because it will lead to more mistakes. I think that's what he and Castiel were discussing and it's part of Sam reclaiming who he is. I think it's one thing he needs to overcome and we may have seen the first stage of that here.

I found Sam's part of the story conveyed his heroic nature, too. His speech that his life wasn't worth more than anyone else's and his actions told me that he was choosing a hero path. He wants to do whatever it takes not only to make right what he's done wrong in the past but also to help stop the threat currently happening with the angels---a threat that he isn't responsible for causing. Castiel was duped by Metatron----whi ch led to the Fall, after all. Sam wants to send the angels back where they belong so they can no longer do to others what Gadreel did to him. That's a heroic story to me.

I'm hopeful as we go further into the season that we'll see more of the Cain and Abel story unfold in Sam and Dean's and that we'll see how the myharcs of Cain's Mark and the search for Metatron/Gadree l will give both brothers their heroic path.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 11:27
Quote:
This a wonderful review, very detailed and informative! As a matter of fact, I think that you flesh out the Sam/Abel perspective far better than the actual episode did. I have been a pretty big fan of the way in which Supernatural uses and manipulates conventional religion to flesh out the world within the show for the most part. But my defensive inner Sam Girl can't help but notice that the spin that they've taken with the Cain and Abel story here doesn't do Sam any favors as a character. I love what it's doing for Dean, it has been crafted to meld in perfectly with what we know and admire about Dean and what we would expect him to do, everything seems very consistent and honest. But what does this interpretation do for Sam? The primary problem that I have with the episode is that once again, there is a great deal of detail about Cain/Dean, but very little about Sam/Abel; TPTB have drawn the parallel but we've only had half of the story. The Cain story has been altered to show Cain (and by extension Dean) in a very favorable and heroic light. He is willing to give up everything, endure eternal hell on earth and being labeled the villain for all eternity for the sake of his beloved brother. We've seen this trope so many times this season that I am looking for anvils to begin dropping from the sky; and I don't have a problem with this alteration as it concerns Dean; he IS a hero, he WILL do anything to save Sam. But where does Sam fit into this? Is he going to continue to be the brother who makes the wrong decisions? Who needs saving? Who's choices cause never ending pain to everyone? We've seen this…and I wan't more for Sam than a re-tread of this tired out old story. He deserves better and he deserves the character development that comes with learning from your mistakes.

So, what about the Abel and Sam connection? What does the story the show is constructing say about them as characters and as heroes? As it currently stands, the Cain/Abel mythology shows only that Abel was foolish and allowed his deeds to subject his brother to never ending torment. He was tricked or duped into courting evil, and he needed his older brother to save him because he's always making the wrong decisions. He gets to rejoice in heaven while his brother is tormented in hell. It's hardly a heroic character profile they're building, and since we haven't heard from Abel himself we can't even know if this is even the whole story. And this may not be true of Sam either, but the show is drawing the parallel, and without any information from Sam himself, all we can do as viewer is accept the parallel that is being shown to us. We only know about Abel through Cain and we only know about Sam through Dean, or in the case of this particular episode, through Castiel, because even though we were supposed to be learning about Sam in the B plot, he didn't really say much, and Castiel did all that talking. I am hoping that there is more to this story then the current subtext is suggesting; Cain/Dean is heroic, misunderstood and will be punished for his good deeds and that Sam/Abel is easily lead astray and his transgressions will cause unending pain for his older brother for all eternity.

In general, I love Robbie Thompson's episodes, but he's not great at writing Sam, and this episode is no exception. The connection between Cain and Dean is obvious and rich in detail with the alterations to the Cain and Abel storyline manipulated to show Dean in his best and most heroic light and in a way that is honest and consistent with the show's canon. But there is currently very little to connect Sam to Abel that was explored in this episode that was meaningful or insightful in any way and the little bit of connection that was made is distinctly unflattering to Sam as a character. I realize that I am probably jumping the gun here and that more detail is on it's way. I can only hope that this episode is only a preliminary installment of a story that fleshes out BOTH sides of the story to include detail for both brothers to be heroes.
Thanks for the comment.

I found the introduction of the Cain and Abel story to signify that Sam and Dean could do something that those brothers could not. We certainly are not told much either Biblically or in Cain's telling of what happened what Abel was feeling/doing exactly, but I think as we go forward and this becomes more of a construct for the show, we may learn more. I think, in the scheme of introducing the new myharc focusing on Dean they had this portion of the story focus on him for now.

In regards to Sam's story, I felt that a lot his words and actions were his way of taking back his body, his mind, and his life. He chose to undergo the extraction so that he could find Gadreel so that he could confront the angel that duped Dean into possessing him. Castiel was against these actions, and yet Sam overruled him at almost every turn. Sam was also owning up to mistakes he made, which is a part of who he is. But he also needs to learn that he can't allow guilt to consume nor destroy him because it will lead to more mistakes. I think that's what he and Castiel were discussing and it's part of Sam reclaiming who he is. I think it's one thing he needs to overcome and we may have seen the first stage of that here.

I found Sam's part of the story conveyed his heroic nature, too. His speech that his life wasn't worth more than anyone else's and his actions told me that he was choosing a hero path. He wants to do whatever it takes not only to make right what he's done wrong in the past but also to help stop the threat currently happening with the angels---a threat that he isn't responsible for causing. Castiel was duped by Metatron----whi ch led to the Fall, after all. Sam wants to send the angels back where they belong so they can no longer do to others what Gadreel did to him. That's a heroic story to me.

I'm hopeful as we go further into the season that we'll see more of the Cain and Abel story unfold in Sam and Dean's and that we'll see how the myharcs of Cain's Mark and the search for Metatron/Gadree l will give both brothers their heroic path.

Thanks again.
lkeke35
# lkeke35 2014-01-26 15:25
One helpful way to look at Sam's situation is that of a sexual assault survivor. He had his agency, his control of self, taken from him by both Dean and Gadreel. Sometimes assault survivors attempt to regain the agency or control they feel was taken from them by engaging in extreme behaviours. Its a way of reaffirming their ability to make their own choices. Some of them become suicidal or run away a lot or engage in lawbreaking behaviour as a way of re establishing their ability to make choices for themselves and I see Sam's suicidal behaviour in the same light. Not all survivors do this but the motivation is the same.

Also one of the reasons Cain chose Dean is a way of rewriting the narrative hes already lived and failed. The biggest difference between these two stories is that Abel is dead. He can no longer affect t the narrative the way Sam can. Sam and Dean can take this story of the first murderer in a direction that doesn't end in tragedy for everyone and that's Cain's big hope, I think. Dean is another chance at redemption for him. To make something good come out of all the bad hes done or maybe I'm reading too much into it. Idk. But I do like where this story is attempting to go. I'm hopeful that this season doesn't end in separation of some kind or sickness or something. The brothers need a win instead of things going from bad to worse to even worse. If things just keep going from bad to badder than there's no point in watching the show as part of the fun is watching characters WIN against long odds and we've had about two years of fighting and loss. Something good has to come out of some of this.
lkeke35
# lkeke35 2014-01-26 15:25
One helpful way to look at Sam's situation is that of a sexual assault survivor. He had his agency, his control of self, taken from him by both Dean and Gadreel. Sometimes assault survivors attempt to regain the agency or control they feel was taken from them by engaging in extreme behaviours. Its a way of reaffirming their ability to make their own choices. Some of them become suicidal or run away a lot or engage in lawbreaking behaviour as a way of re establishing their ability to make choices for themselves and I see Sam's suicidal behaviour in the same light. Not all survivors do this but the motivation is the same.

Also one of the reasons Cain chose Dean is a way of rewriting the narrative hes already lived and failed. The biggest difference between these two stories is that Abel is dead. He can no longer affect t the narrative the way Sam can. Sam and Dean can take this story of the first murderer in a direction that doesn't end in tragedy for everyone and that's Cain's big hope, I think. Dean is another chance at redemption for him. To make something good come out of all the bad hes done or maybe I'm reading too much into it. Idk. But I do like where this story is attempting to go. I'm hopeful that this season doesn't end in separation of some kind or sickness or something. The brothers need a win instead of things going from bad to worse to even worse. If things just keep going from bad to badder than there's no point in watching the show as part of the fun is watching characters WIN against long odds and we've had about two years of fighting and loss. Something good has to come out of some of this.
Abby S
# Abby S 2014-01-26 15:32
I have been thinking about why Sam would, it seems, suddenly go back to having this overwhelming problem with guilt. I remember the episode with that Egyptian god where Sam told Dean that he didn't feel guilty anymore, that he had gone to hell and paid his dues.

Sam has to know that he didn't kill Kevin and yet he is behaving like he consciously committed the murder.
We know he was ready to die and ready to have Death cut him off from ever being resurrected by anyone or anything (although I'm pretty sure he only meant Dean) because he didn't want anyone else to get hurt.
Dean tricked him, some one got hurt. I get that.
He is angry with Dean for tricking him and justifiably so but why the guilt. He has knows this all on Dean, right? Even if it was his body controlled by Gadreel.

I thought back to when Sam murdered that hunter while being possessed. He was really upset about it but nothing to this extent. (granted, that was like in Season 2?)
I thought that maybe, since Sam was going through the trials and having all those vivid flashbacks and memories of being a kid, of specific classes he had at Stanford, that maybe all the "sins' of his past and their guilt came back with that. It made sense to me in the church when he was so ready to die to close the gates "Other people will die if I don't finish this".
I mean, earlier in the season after they had killed the Hellhound for the first trial, Sam said he wanted to close the gates of hell, but he also wanted to live.
Why the change? I asked at the season finale and opener.

I know what Kevin meant to them (I know what Kevin mean to me!!) - Sam is grieving too and guilt is apart of that process. But this extreme, running towards death guilt, a way of channeling the anger he has towards those who tricked him? I get the guilt, but why so extreme when he knows deep down that he's not responsible?
Is this just a pigheaded Winchester thing?

Any thoughts?
Abby S
# Abby S 2014-01-26 15:32
I have been thinking about why Sam would, it seems, suddenly go back to having this overwhelming problem with guilt. I remember the episode with that Egyptian god where Sam told Dean that he didn't feel guilty anymore, that he had gone to hell and paid his dues.

Sam has to know that he didn't kill Kevin and yet he is behaving like he consciously committed the murder.
We know he was ready to die and ready to have Death cut him off from ever being resurrected by anyone or anything (although I'm pretty sure he only meant Dean) because he didn't want anyone else to get hurt.
Dean tricked him, some one got hurt. I get that.
He is angry with Dean for tricking him and justifiably so but why the guilt. He has knows this all on Dean, right? Even if it was his body controlled by Gadreel.

I thought back to when Sam murdered that hunter while being possessed. He was really upset about it but nothing to this extent. (granted, that was like in Season 2?)
I thought that maybe, since Sam was going through the trials and having all those vivid flashbacks and memories of being a kid, of specific classes he had at Stanford, that maybe all the "sins' of his past and their guilt came back with that. It made sense to me in the church when he was so ready to die to close the gates "Other people will die if I don't finish this".
I mean, earlier in the season after they had killed the Hellhound for the first trial, Sam said he wanted to close the gates of hell, but he also wanted to live.
Why the change? I asked at the season finale and opener.

I know what Kevin meant to them (I know what Kevin mean to me!!) - Sam is grieving too and guilt is apart of that process. But this extreme, running towards death guilt, a way of channeling the anger he has towards those who tricked him? I get the guilt, but why so extreme when he knows deep down that he's not responsible?
Is this just a pigheaded Winchester thing?

Any thoughts?
lkeke35
# lkeke35 2014-01-26 15:50
I know you weren't talking to me but it could be a form of survivor's guilt. Once again Sam is alive and he paid for that life with someone else's death - Kevin. Sam has self esteem issues too and doesn't believe his life is worth more than anyone else's life. For every person that died because Dean made a decision to save him - selling his soul, Sacrifice, Gadreel - he feels is too high a price to pay for the life of someone as unworthy as himself. Its a horrible feeling to think someone else is dead because you are alive and suicidal tendencies is one of the ways a person would attempt to escape such feeling. Cas said all the right things to him. He assured Sam that he was worthy. Essentially having the same conversation with Sam that Cain was having with Dean. They are both worthy. Now the two of them need to hear it, in no uncertain terms and no confusion or equivocation's, from each other. I hope that happens.

But once again, Imo. Ive just been giving this a lot of thought that's why I answered. ;-)
lkeke35
# lkeke35 2014-01-26 15:50
I know you weren't talking to me but it could be a form of survivor's guilt. Once again Sam is alive and he paid for that life with someone else's death - Kevin. Sam has self esteem issues too and doesn't believe his life is worth more than anyone else's life. For every person that died because Dean made a decision to save him - selling his soul, Sacrifice, Gadreel - he feels is too high a price to pay for the life of someone as unworthy as himself. Its a horrible feeling to think someone else is dead because you are alive and suicidal tendencies is one of the ways a person would attempt to escape such feeling. Cas said all the right things to him. He assured Sam that he was worthy. Essentially having the same conversation with Sam that Cain was having with Dean. They are both worthy. Now the two of them need to hear it, in no uncertain terms and no confusion or equivocation's, from each other. I hope that happens.

But once again, Imo. Ive just been giving this a lot of thought that's why I answered. ;-)
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 15:53
Quoting lkeke35:
One helpful way to look at Sam's situation is that of a sexual assault survivor. He had his agency, his control of self, taken from him by both Dean and Gadreel. Sometimes assault survivors attempt to regain the agency or control they feel was taken from them by engaging in extreme behaviours. Its a way of reaffirming their ability to make their own choices. Some of them become suicidal or run away a lot or engage in lawbreaking behaviour as a way of re establishing their ability to make choices for themselves and I see Sam's suicidal behaviour in the same light. Not all survivors do this but the motivation is the same.

Also one of the reasons Cain chose Dean is a way of rewriting the narrative hes already lived and failed. The biggest difference between these two stories is that Abel is dead. He can no longer affect t the narrative the way Sam can. Sam and Dean can take this story of the first murderer in a direction that doesn't end in tragedy for everyone and that's Cain's big hope, I think. Dean is another chance at redemption for him. To make something good come out of all the bad hes done or maybe I'm reading too much into it. Idk. But I do like where this story is attempting to go. I'm hopeful that this season doesn't end in separation of some kind or sickness or something. The brothers need a win instead of things going from bad to worse to even worse. If things just keep going from bad to badder than there's no point in watching the show as part of the fun is watching characters WIN against long odds and we've had about two years of fighting and loss. Something good has to come out of some of this.



Thanks for the comment.

I think that's a fair assessment of Sam's situation in many ways, yes. He wants to take control back, and this is one way he's doing it. I think he feels guilty for not finishing the Trials and once he regressed back towards before Gadreel it just added to the guilt because he was a hair's breath from dying there (Ie "So?") Now he's trying anything and everything to fix that and alleviate his guilt for not finishing.

I also agree with your view on Cain. He would see Dean as the next torch bearer. Someone who could do what he can't/couldn't when it came to Abel. He knows Sam is alive---judging by his remark about Sam's whereabouts. The fighting wasn't so much the issue for Cain---not as much as Crowley made it out. It was why Dean fought. I think that's a fair reasoning.

I'm hopeful that as we progress into the back half, though, that we'll see more reason for hope. Dean has a method to dispatch Abaddon, and now that Cas is back in their corner working with Sam to find Metatron, I'm hopeful that they'll beat him.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 15:53
Quote:
One helpful way to look at Sam's situation is that of a sexual assault survivor. He had his agency, his control of self, taken from him by both Dean and Gadreel. Sometimes assault survivors attempt to regain the agency or control they feel was taken from them by engaging in extreme behaviours. Its a way of reaffirming their ability to make their own choices. Some of them become suicidal or run away a lot or engage in lawbreaking behaviour as a way of re establishing their ability to make choices for themselves and I see Sam's suicidal behaviour in the same light. Not all survivors do this but the motivation is the same.

Also one of the reasons Cain chose Dean is a way of rewriting the narrative hes already lived and failed. The biggest difference between these two stories is that Abel is dead. He can no longer affect t the narrative the way Sam can. Sam and Dean can take this story of the first murderer in a direction that doesn't end in tragedy for everyone and that's Cain's big hope, I think. Dean is another chance at redemption for him. To make something good come out of all the bad hes done or maybe I'm reading too much into it. Idk. But I do like where this story is attempting to go. I'm hopeful that this season doesn't end in separation of some kind or sickness or something. The brothers need a win instead of things going from bad to worse to even worse. If things just keep going from bad to badder than there's no point in watching the show as part of the fun is watching characters WIN against long odds and we've had about two years of fighting and loss. Something good has to come out of some of this.
Thanks for the comment.

I think that's a fair assessment of Sam's situation in many ways, yes. He wants to take control back, and this is one way he's doing it. I think he feels guilty for not finishing the Trials and once he regressed back towards before Gadreel it just added to the guilt because he was a hair's breath from dying there (Ie "So?") Now he's trying anything and everything to fix that and alleviate his guilt for not finishing.

I also agree with your view on Cain. He would see Dean as the next torch bearer. Someone who could do what he can't/couldn't when it came to Abel. He knows Sam is alive---judging by his remark about Sam's whereabouts. The fighting wasn't so much the issue for Cain---not as much as Crowley made it out. It was why Dean fought. I think that's a fair reasoning.

I'm hopeful that as we progress into the back half, though, that we'll see more reason for hope. Dean has a method to dispatch Abaddon, and now that Cas is back in their corner working with Sam to find Metatron, I'm hopeful that they'll beat him.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 15:56
Quoting lkeke35:
I know you weren't talking to me but it could be a form of survivor's guilt. Once again Sam is alive and he paid for that life with someone else's death - Kevin. Sam has self esteem issues too and doesn't believe his life is worth more than anyone else's life. For every person that died because Dean made a decision to save him - selling his soul, Sacrifice, Gadreel - he feels is too high a price to pay for the life of someone as unworthy as himself. Its a horrible feeling to think someone else is dead because you are alive and suicidal tendencies is one of the ways a person would attempt to escape such feeling. Cas said all the right things to him. He assured Sam that he was worthy. Essentially having the same conversation with Sam that Cain was having with Dean. They are both worthy. Now the two of them need to hear it, in no uncertain terms and no confusion or equivocation's, from each other. I hope that happens.

But once again, Imo. Ive just been giving this a lot of thought that's why I answered. ;-)


Thanks for the comment.

I think the reason that Sam feels so guilty here is direct correlation to the fact that he chose to stop the Trials. They had promised Kevin that they would finish them, close the Gates and block all demons from ever hurting him again. Instead, he chose to stop and Hell is remaining open. Granted that Kevin was killed by an angel and not a demon is beside the point. If Sam had closed Hell, in his view, Kevin would still be alive.

I also think it's a Winchester thing. Both brothers have this struggle, and both brothers need to hash it out for themselves and as a duo to get past it.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 15:56
Quote:
I know you weren't talking to me but it could be a form of survivor's guilt. Once again Sam is alive and he paid for that life with someone else's death - Kevin. Sam has self esteem issues too and doesn't believe his life is worth more than anyone else's life. For every person that died because Dean made a decision to save him - selling his soul, Sacrifice, Gadreel - he feels is too high a price to pay for the life of someone as unworthy as himself. Its a horrible feeling to think someone else is dead because you are alive and suicidal tendencies is one of the ways a person would attempt to escape such feeling. Cas said all the right things to him. He assured Sam that he was worthy. Essentially having the same conversation with Sam that Cain was having with Dean. They are both worthy. Now the two of them need to hear it, in no uncertain terms and no confusion or equivocation's, from each other. I hope that happens.

But once again, Imo. Ive just been giving this a lot of thought that's why I answered. ;-)
Thanks for the comment.

I think the reason that Sam feels so guilty here is direct correlation to the fact that he chose to stop the Trials. They had promised Kevin that they would finish them, close the Gates and block all demons from ever hurting him again. Instead, he chose to stop and Hell is remaining open. Granted that Kevin was killed by an angel and not a demon is beside the point. If Sam had closed Hell, in his view, Kevin would still be alive.

I also think it's a Winchester thing. Both brothers have this struggle, and both brothers need to hash it out for themselves and as a duo to get past it.

Thanks again.
Evelyn
# Evelyn 2014-01-26 16:31
I don't have anything to add to what has already been said, I just wanted to tell you - MOST AWESOME review. Thank you for comparing the biblical story of Cain and Abel between the Supernatural story and how that fits in with Dean and Sam. I appreciated that.

This was a great episode and there is much food for thought here. Everybody really brought their A+ game to this episode. Thanks again for your review.
Evelyn
# Evelyn 2014-01-26 16:31
I don't have anything to add to what has already been said, I just wanted to tell you - MOST AWESOME review. Thank you for comparing the biblical story of Cain and Abel between the Supernatural story and how that fits in with Dean and Sam. I appreciated that.

This was a great episode and there is much food for thought here. Everybody really brought their A+ game to this episode. Thanks again for your review.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 16:52
Quoting Evelyn:
I don't have anything to add to what has already been said, I just wanted to tell you - MOST AWESOME review. Thank you for comparing the biblical story of Cain and Abel between the Supernatural story and how that fits in with Dean and Sam. I appreciated that.

This was a great episode and there is much food for thought here. Everybody really brought their A+ game to this episode. Thanks again for your review.



Thanks for the comment.

I'm glad you enjoyed my take on this episode. I thought it was one of the best of the season on so many levels. I'm glad you liked how I related Cain and Abel to Sam and Dean. It just seems to me that they're meant to reclaim what was stolen from the original brothers. I so hope we get to see that.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 16:52
Quote:
I don't have anything to add to what has already been said, I just wanted to tell you - MOST AWESOME review. Thank you for comparing the biblical story of Cain and Abel between the Supernatural story and how that fits in with Dean and Sam. I appreciated that.

This was a great episode and there is much food for thought here. Everybody really brought their A+ game to this episode. Thanks again for your review.
Thanks for the comment.

I'm glad you enjoyed my take on this episode. I thought it was one of the best of the season on so many levels. I'm glad you liked how I related Cain and Abel to Sam and Dean. It just seems to me that they're meant to reclaim what was stolen from the original brothers. I so hope we get to see that.

Thanks again!
Evelyn
# Evelyn 2014-01-26 17:18
"It just seems to me that they're meant to reclaim what was stolen from the original brothers. I so hope we get to see that."

And THAT is the thought I really love. Dean has already sacrificed his soul for his younger brother. Has died, come back, and continues to sacrifice for his younger brother. He doesn't need to do that again.

They both averted the apocalypse, hence they fulfilled their mission as angelic vessels.

So, the fact that their mission now will be to reclaim the brotherhood of the "original brothers" Cain and Abel would be a very fitting way for the show to end. I like that. I really do. And I do hope that that is the direction that the Show is following. Wouldn't that be great?! Dean and Sam righting the wrongs of actions taken by the "first" brothers centuries before. That's such a cool thought. From your mind to actual happenings.
Evelyn
# Evelyn 2014-01-26 17:18
"It just seems to me that they're meant to reclaim what was stolen from the original brothers. I so hope we get to see that."

And THAT is the thought I really love. Dean has already sacrificed his soul for his younger brother. Has died, come back, and continues to sacrifice for his younger brother. He doesn't need to do that again.

They both averted the apocalypse, hence they fulfilled their mission as angelic vessels.

So, the fact that their mission now will be to reclaim the brotherhood of the "original brothers" Cain and Abel would be a very fitting way for the show to end. I like that. I really do. And I do hope that that is the direction that the Show is following. Wouldn't that be great?! Dean and Sam righting the wrongs of actions taken by the "first" brothers centuries before. That's such a cool thought. From your mind to actual happenings.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 17:49
Quoting Evelyn:
"It just seems to me that they're meant to reclaim what was stolen from the original brothers. I so hope we get to see that."

And THAT is the thought I really love. Dean has already sacrificed his soul for his younger brother. Has died, come back, and continues to sacrifice for his younger brother. He doesn't need to do that again.

They both averted the apocalypse, hence they fulfilled their mission as angelic vessels.

So, the fact that their mission now will be to reclaim the brotherhood of the "original brothers" Cain and Abel would be a very fitting way for the show to end. I like that. I really do. And I do hope that that is the direction that the Show is following. Wouldn't that be great?! Dean and Sam righting the wrongs of actions taken by the "first" brothers centuries before. That's such a cool thought. From your mind to actual happenings.


It's how I'm seeing the direction. It just seems to make sense. I've been thinking about Cain and that whole fight scene/conversat ions after some discussion in the comments here. I think Cain chose Dean not because he's a killer/kick ass fighter as much as he was pleased with Dean's response of "Because you never give up on family. Ever." That seems to be what Cain liked and why he transferred the mark.

I'm sure we're going to see all sorts of other side effects that come along with it---some dark, some perhaps not---but it just seems to me that Cain saw the same thing in Dean (ie the brotherly love) and knew he could safely pass the torch to him.

Knowing that Crowley set it all up in a lot of ways, I have to wonder, is that also why Crowley says that Dean is worthy? Did he know that Cain would look for that answer from Dean---not just the Fight Night?

Either way, I think it makes me very hopeful for the remainder of the season and show.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 17:49
Quote:
"It just seems to me that they're meant to reclaim what was stolen from the original brothers. I so hope we get to see that."

And THAT is the thought I really love. Dean has already sacrificed his soul for his younger brother. Has died, come back, and continues to sacrifice for his younger brother. He doesn't need to do that again.

They both averted the apocalypse, hence they fulfilled their mission as angelic vessels.

So, the fact that their mission now will be to reclaim the brotherhood of the "original brothers" Cain and Abel would be a very fitting way for the show to end. I like that. I really do. And I do hope that that is the direction that the Show is following. Wouldn't that be great?! Dean and Sam righting the wrongs of actions taken by the "first" brothers centuries before. That's such a cool thought. From your mind to actual happenings.
It's how I'm seeing the direction. It just seems to make sense. I've been thinking about Cain and that whole fight scene/conversat ions after some discussion in the comments here. I think Cain chose Dean not because he's a killer/kick ass fighter as much as he was pleased with Dean's response of "Because you never give up on family. Ever." That seems to be what Cain liked and why he transferred the mark.

I'm sure we're going to see all sorts of other side effects that come along with it---some dark, some perhaps not---but it just seems to me that Cain saw the same thing in Dean (ie the brotherly love) and knew he could safely pass the torch to him.

Knowing that Crowley set it all up in a lot of ways, I have to wonder, is that also why Crowley says that Dean is worthy? Did he know that Cain would look for that answer from Dean---not just the Fight Night?

Either way, I think it makes me very hopeful for the remainder of the season and show.
novemberschild
# novemberschild 2014-01-26 19:31
I enjoy how you can weave all the elements and themes of an episode into your review, Far away eyes. I like how you brought the story of Cain and Abel and S5 TSRTS into each other so that they link up and we can see how they match up.
I also enjoyed how you brought up S6 Mommy Dearest and how Cas views life now. Back then he was a "bigger picture" kind of guy and now he realizes the value of one person and how important each life is. I am hoping Cas will be able to help Dean and Sam forgive each other and trust each other again. Even though they both didn't want to think about each other this episode, we could see the pain and grief in them, not only for Kevin but for each other.

On a different note, I just wanted to say I enjoy all the reviews that are written here. I appreciate all the time, effort and thought that must go into reviewing an episode, a SPN episode is not the easiest to do, there are usually so many little layers that you have to think about and I always re watch about 4 times before I make up my mind about an episode.
I enjoy all the reviewers past and present and miss the ones that aren't here anymore. I am a long time lurker but finally decided to de-lurk to share in our little show that could. I have never been this way about any other show before and in a way it is weird and in another way it seems ok. :)
novemberschild
# novemberschild 2014-01-26 19:31
I enjoy how you can weave all the elements and themes of an episode into your review, Far away eyes. I like how you brought the story of Cain and Abel and S5 TSRTS into each other so that they link up and we can see how they match up.
I also enjoyed how you brought up S6 Mommy Dearest and how Cas views life now. Back then he was a "bigger picture" kind of guy and now he realizes the value of one person and how important each life is. I am hoping Cas will be able to help Dean and Sam forgive each other and trust each other again. Even though they both didn't want to think about each other this episode, we could see the pain and grief in them, not only for Kevin but for each other.

On a different note, I just wanted to say I enjoy all the reviews that are written here. I appreciate all the time, effort and thought that must go into reviewing an episode, a SPN episode is not the easiest to do, there are usually so many little layers that you have to think about and I always re watch about 4 times before I make up my mind about an episode.
I enjoy all the reviewers past and present and miss the ones that aren't here anymore. I am a long time lurker but finally decided to de-lurk to share in our little show that could. I have never been this way about any other show before and in a way it is weird and in another way it seems ok. :)
Pragmatic Dreamer
# Pragmatic Dreamer 2014-01-26 20:26
Hi Faraway Eyes,

Great review. I love the way you wove the Serpent invading Eden into the biblical story, the bunker and the brotherhood. (Hey, the 3 B's.. bees.. And Cain is a beekeeper.... !)

I find it interesting that both Cain & Crowley told Dean he was worthy. In Cain's case, worthy of carrying the mark. But also, like you suggested, worthy of carrying the brotherhood, and attempting to mend the brotherhood bond. I also think both men were trying to tell Dean he had worth as an individual. Cain was very complimentary of Dean's bravery for instance. And I don't think Crowley was just complimenting Dean on his skills as a killer. I think he, begrudginly likes & admires Dean & Sam. He certainly respects their intelligence and is one of the few villains to not underestimate their abilities. I actually wondered if Cain's "you're worthy" comment was meant to be ambiguous. Dean is also supposed to be the righteous man. Perhaps he sensed that? Perhaps he sensed Dean's dichotomy - warrior and caregiver.

I find Crowley's line about no one hating Dean more than Dean does, quite perceptive and poignant. But at this point, Dean feels the only thing he's worthy of is hate, and abandonment.

Then over to Sam. He was heartbreaking. "I just want to do something right". He wants to have a win, pure & simple, and one that doesn't come covered in the blood of an innocent. That is so understandable. All the Winchester victories have come at such great cost.

What I find particularly interesting is that both boys carry tremendous guilt for the decisions they've made and for the choices thrust upon them. Neither feels he is worthy of anything, not even worthy of the other brother's love & affection and presence. Both are so willing to sacrifice themselves if there's a chance they can save others, or if there's a chance their death can serve as an atonement for all those other deaths.

So, basically they are experiencing EXACTLY the same feelings, but they react so differently. They both push it down, but it bubbles up in different ways. Sam feels he should die to even the cosmic balance. Dean feels he should become the "killer" that he thinks everyone sees him as, and hopefully get killed in the process, thus he can even the cosmic balance. Sam is acting inward. Dean is acting outward. It's reflective of their personalities. Both are so willingly rushing towards their deaths (very perceptive of Cas!)

As for the burden/cost of the Mark of Cain, maybe it's that you feel every death you cause, even more intensely. That would destroy Dean, since he already feels each one. I'm also intrigued by Abaddon's throwaway? comment about Dean being the perfect vessel.... Was that a foreshadowing?

I'm blathering. But thanks for giving me lots to think about! (I'm presently working on my own thinky-thought piece. So much to consider from just one hour of TV. Awesome!!!)

Pragmatic Dreamer
Pragmatic Dreamer
# Pragmatic Dreamer 2014-01-26 20:26
Hi Faraway Eyes,

Great review. I love the way you wove the Serpent invading Eden into the biblical story, the bunker and the brotherhood. (Hey, the 3 B's.. bees.. And Cain is a beekeeper.... !)

I find it interesting that both Cain & Crowley told Dean he was worthy. In Cain's case, worthy of carrying the mark. But also, like you suggested, worthy of carrying the brotherhood, and attempting to mend the brotherhood bond. I also think both men were trying to tell Dean he had worth as an individual. Cain was very complimentary of Dean's bravery for instance. And I don't think Crowley was just complimenting Dean on his skills as a killer. I think he, begrudginly likes & admires Dean & Sam. He certainly respects their intelligence and is one of the few villains to not underestimate their abilities. I actually wondered if Cain's "you're worthy" comment was meant to be ambiguous. Dean is also supposed to be the righteous man. Perhaps he sensed that? Perhaps he sensed Dean's dichotomy - warrior and caregiver.

I find Crowley's line about no one hating Dean more than Dean does, quite perceptive and poignant. But at this point, Dean feels the only thing he's worthy of is hate, and abandonment.

Then over to Sam. He was heartbreaking. "I just want to do something right". He wants to have a win, pure & simple, and one that doesn't come covered in the blood of an innocent. That is so understandable. All the Winchester victories have come at such great cost.

What I find particularly interesting is that both boys carry tremendous guilt for the decisions they've made and for the choices thrust upon them. Neither feels he is worthy of anything, not even worthy of the other brother's love & affection and presence. Both are so willing to sacrifice themselves if there's a chance they can save others, or if there's a chance their death can serve as an atonement for all those other deaths.

So, basically they are experiencing EXACTLY the same feelings, but they react so differently. They both push it down, but it bubbles up in different ways. Sam feels he should die to even the cosmic balance. Dean feels he should become the "killer" that he thinks everyone sees him as, and hopefully get killed in the process, thus he can even the cosmic balance. Sam is acting inward. Dean is acting outward. It's reflective of their personalities. Both are so willingly rushing towards their deaths (very perceptive of Cas!)

As for the burden/cost of the Mark of Cain, maybe it's that you feel every death you cause, even more intensely. That would destroy Dean, since he already feels each one. I'm also intrigued by Abaddon's throwaway? comment about Dean being the perfect vessel.... Was that a foreshadowing?

I'm blathering. But thanks for giving me lots to think about! (I'm presently working on my own thinky-thought piece. So much to consider from just one hour of TV. Awesome!!!)

Pragmatic Dreamer
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 21:08
Quoting novemberschild:
I enjoy how you can weave all the elements and themes of an episode into your review, Far away eyes. I like how you brought the story of Cain and Abel and S5 TSRTS into each other so that they link up and we can see how they match up.
I also enjoyed how you brought up S6 Mommy Dearest and how Cas views life now. Back then he was a "bigger picture" kind of guy and now he realizes the value of one person and how important each life is. I am hoping Cas will be able to help Dean and Sam forgive each other and trust each other again. Even though they both didn't want to think about each other this episode, we could see the pain and grief in them, not only for Kevin but for each other.

On a different note, I just wanted to say I enjoy all the reviews that are written here. I appreciate all the time, effort and thought that must go into reviewing an episode, a SPN episode is not the easiest to do, there are usually so many little layers that you have to think about and I always re watch about 4 times before I make up my mind about an episode.
I enjoy all the reviewers past and present and miss the ones that aren't here anymore. I am a long time lurker but finally decided to de-lurk to share in our little show that could. I have never been this way about any other show before and in a way it is weird and in another way it seems ok. :)



Thank you for the comment.

It takes me a couple days and a couple viewings to even figure out where I'm going on the page so I can understand. This show makes me think and feel and I only feel compelled to write about it because I want to understand what the show is saying to me. The fact that others enjoy reading that result is awesome to me.

This one came easier than the one for "Road Trip," but it took me going from the simple Cain and Abel story to finding out how it matches up with the show and what it seems to say about where it is going. I'm glad you liked how that turned out.

I'm so glad someone appreciates how much work it goes into writing one of these. They take some time--mine usually about four days of thinking/writin g/editing/scree ncapping. I do it because I enjoy it so it is time well spent. I, too, miss some of those who've left the site, but I feel like we've gotten some nice new blood like Gerry.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 21:08
Quote:
I enjoy how you can weave all the elements and themes of an episode into your review, Far away eyes. I like how you brought the story of Cain and Abel and S5 TSRTS into each other so that they link up and we can see how they match up.
I also enjoyed how you brought up S6 Mommy Dearest and how Cas views life now. Back then he was a "bigger picture" kind of guy and now he realizes the value of one person and how important each life is. I am hoping Cas will be able to help Dean and Sam forgive each other and trust each other again. Even though they both didn't want to think about each other this episode, we could see the pain and grief in them, not only for Kevin but for each other.

On a different note, I just wanted to say I enjoy all the reviews that are written here. I appreciate all the time, effort and thought that must go into reviewing an episode, a SPN episode is not the easiest to do, there are usually so many little layers that you have to think about and I always re watch about 4 times before I make up my mind about an episode.
I enjoy all the reviewers past and present and miss the ones that aren't here anymore. I am a long time lurker but finally decided to de-lurk to share in our little show that could. I have never been this way about any other show before and in a way it is weird and in another way it seems ok. :)
Thank you for the comment.

It takes me a couple days and a couple viewings to even figure out where I'm going on the page so I can understand. This show makes me think and feel and I only feel compelled to write about it because I want to understand what the show is saying to me. The fact that others enjoy reading that result is awesome to me.

This one came easier than the one for "Road Trip," but it took me going from the simple Cain and Abel story to finding out how it matches up with the show and what it seems to say about where it is going. I'm glad you liked how that turned out.

I'm so glad someone appreciates how much work it goes into writing one of these. They take some time--mine usually about four days of thinking/writin g/editing/scree ncapping. I do it because I enjoy it so it is time well spent. I, too, miss some of those who've left the site, but I feel like we've gotten some nice new blood like Gerry.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 21:16
Quoting Pragmatic Dreamer:
Hi Faraway Eyes,

Great review. I love the way you wove the Serpent invading Eden into the biblical story, the bunker and the brotherhood. (Hey, the 3 B's.. bees.. And Cain is a beekeeper.... !)

I find it interesting that both Cain & Crowley told Dean he was worthy. In Cain's case, worthy of carrying the mark. But also, like you suggested, worthy of carrying the brotherhood, and attempting to mend the brotherhood bond. I also think both men were trying to tell Dean he had worth as an individual. Cain was very complimentary of Dean's bravery for instance. And I don't think Crowley was just complimenting Dean on his skills as a killer. I think he, begrudginly likes & admires Dean & Sam. He certainly respects their intelligence and is one of the few villains to not underestimate their abilities. I actually wondered if Cain's "you're worthy" comment was meant to be ambiguous. Dean is also supposed to be the righteous man. Perhaps he sensed that? Perhaps he sensed Dean's dichotomy - warrior and caregiver.

I find Crowley's line about no one hating Dean more than Dean does, quite perceptive and poignant. But at this point, Dean feels the only thing he's worthy of is hate, and abandonment.

Then over to Sam. He was heartbreaking. "I just want to do something right". He wants to have a win, pure & simple, and one that doesn't come covered in the blood of an innocent. That is so understandable. All the Winchester victories have come at such great cost.

What I find particularly interesting is that both boys carry tremendous guilt for the decisions they've made and for the choices thrust upon them. Neither feels he is worthy of anything, not even worthy of the other brother's love & affection and presence. Both are so willing to sacrifice themselves if there's a chance they can save others, or if there's a chance their death can serve as an atonement for all those other deaths.

So, basically they are experiencing EXACTLY the same feelings, but they react so differently. They both push it down, but it bubbles up in different ways. Sam feels he should die to even the cosmic balance. Dean feels he should become the "killer" that he thinks everyone sees him as, and hopefully get killed in the process, thus he can even the cosmic balance. Sam is acting inward. Dean is acting outward. It's reflective of their personalities. Both are so willingly rushing towards their deaths (very perceptive of Cas!)

As for the burden/cost of the Mark of Cain, maybe it's that you feel every death you cause, even more intensely. That would destroy Dean, since he already feels each one. I'm also intrigued by Abaddon's throwaway? comment about Dean being the perfect vessel.... Was that a foreshadowing?

I'm blathering. But thanks for giving me lots to think about! (I'm presently working on my own thinky-thought piece. So much to consider from just one hour of TV. Awesome!!!)

Pragmatic Dreamer


Thanks for the great comment!

I'm glad you liked my interpretation with the Garden and the transition into the first brothers.

I think you're right. Cain kept telling Dean he was brave. I think that's another key word for him and for us to pay attention to. Dean sees himself as just a killer, nothing else. I think he forgets that he does good with what he does.

I think you nailed it on Sam and Dean's issues. They are facing the same problem but dealing with it in their own ways. I think what they need to do now is share with one another how they do that and explain why so they can truly understand that they're feeling the same things. It's going to help them in the long run to avoid the same problem, I think.

That's an interesting consequence of the Mark of Cain that you suggest. I think it's very possible that each life Dean takes will take a toll on him on a more intense level due to it. It sounds like something Lucifer would inflict on someone. Cain said it was a burden and that it does come with a high cost. If not this type of burden, I wonder what else it will do?

Thanks again for the great comment.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 21:16
Quote:
Hi Faraway Eyes,

Great review. I love the way you wove the Serpent invading Eden into the biblical story, the bunker and the brotherhood. (Hey, the 3 B's.. bees.. And Cain is a beekeeper.... !)

I find it interesting that both Cain & Crowley told Dean he was worthy. In Cain's case, worthy of carrying the mark. But also, like you suggested, worthy of carrying the brotherhood, and attempting to mend the brotherhood bond. I also think both men were trying to tell Dean he had worth as an individual. Cain was very complimentary of Dean's bravery for instance. And I don't think Crowley was just complimenting Dean on his skills as a killer. I think he, begrudginly likes & admires Dean & Sam. He certainly respects their intelligence and is one of the few villains to not underestimate their abilities. I actually wondered if Cain's "you're worthy" comment was meant to be ambiguous. Dean is also supposed to be the righteous man. Perhaps he sensed that? Perhaps he sensed Dean's dichotomy - warrior and caregiver.

I find Crowley's line about no one hating Dean more than Dean does, quite perceptive and poignant. But at this point, Dean feels the only thing he's worthy of is hate, and abandonment.

Then over to Sam. He was heartbreaking. "I just want to do something right". He wants to have a win, pure & simple, and one that doesn't come covered in the blood of an innocent. That is so understandable. All the Winchester victories have come at such great cost.

What I find particularly interesting is that both boys carry tremendous guilt for the decisions they've made and for the choices thrust upon them. Neither feels he is worthy of anything, not even worthy of the other brother's love & affection and presence. Both are so willing to sacrifice themselves if there's a chance they can save others, or if there's a chance their death can serve as an atonement for all those other deaths.

So, basically they are experiencing EXACTLY the same feelings, but they react so differently. They both push it down, but it bubbles up in different ways. Sam feels he should die to even the cosmic balance. Dean feels he should become the "killer" that he thinks everyone sees him as, and hopefully get killed in the process, thus he can even the cosmic balance. Sam is acting inward. Dean is acting outward. It's reflective of their personalities. Both are so willingly rushing towards their deaths (very perceptive of Cas!)

As for the burden/cost of the Mark of Cain, maybe it's that you feel every death you cause, even more intensely. That would destroy Dean, since he already feels each one. I'm also intrigued by Abaddon's throwaway? comment about Dean being the perfect vessel.... Was that a foreshadowing?

I'm blathering. But thanks for giving me lots to think about! (I'm presently working on my own thinky-thought piece. So much to consider from just one hour of TV. Awesome!!!)

Pragmatic Dreamer
Thanks for the great comment!

I'm glad you liked my interpretation with the Garden and the transition into the first brothers.

I think you're right. Cain kept telling Dean he was brave. I think that's another key word for him and for us to pay attention to. Dean sees himself as just a killer, nothing else. I think he forgets that he does good with what he does.

I think you nailed it on Sam and Dean's issues. They are facing the same problem but dealing with it in their own ways. I think what they need to do now is share with one another how they do that and explain why so they can truly understand that they're feeling the same things. It's going to help them in the long run to avoid the same problem, I think.

That's an interesting consequence of the Mark of Cain that you suggest. I think it's very possible that each life Dean takes will take a toll on him on a more intense level due to it. It sounds like something Lucifer would inflict on someone. Cain said it was a burden and that it does come with a high cost. If not this type of burden, I wonder what else it will do?

Thanks again for the great comment.
E
# E 2014-01-26 21:34
Hi Abby S. #23. I can absolutely understand Sam's guilt. He may not have been in control of his body, but it was his body that killed kevin, he can see it happening in his minds eye. So knowing that Dean was in part responsible for the set up probably doesn't help much with his guilt, because he can only see his hand on Kevin's head, can sense the power of Gadreel surge through his body as poor Kevin's eyes are burned from his sockets. It probably doesn't help Sam's sense of guilt that he was on the cusp of stopping something like this from happening twice in the past few episodes; once by not closing the gates of hell and secondly in not going with Death. He must feel that had he gone with Death that Gadreel could never have inhabited him in the first place. If he had, Kevin would still be alive, and that must push all his Winchester Guilt buttons.

#22 Hi Ikeke35… your response is here is really quite brilliant. I love the idea that they are trying to have the Winchesters in a sense right the wrongs of Cain and Abel and are attempting to restore "brotherhood" in some way. TPTB may not have drawn very clear connections between Sam and Abel the way they have between Dean and Cain but there is clearly one way in which the Winchesters are NOT like their biblical counterparts (and kinsmen); Sam is still alive and did not give in to Lucifer's temptation AND Dean didn't kill him, he supported him and it saved the world and each other. Very good observation!
E
# E 2014-01-26 21:34
Hi Abby S. #23. I can absolutely understand Sam's guilt. He may not have been in control of his body, but it was his body that killed kevin, he can see it happening in his minds eye. So knowing that Dean was in part responsible for the set up probably doesn't help much with his guilt, because he can only see his hand on Kevin's head, can sense the power of Gadreel surge through his body as poor Kevin's eyes are burned from his sockets. It probably doesn't help Sam's sense of guilt that he was on the cusp of stopping something like this from happening twice in the past few episodes; once by not closing the gates of hell and secondly in not going with Death. He must feel that had he gone with Death that Gadreel could never have inhabited him in the first place. If he had, Kevin would still be alive, and that must push all his Winchester Guilt buttons.

#22 Hi Ikeke35… your response is here is really quite brilliant. I love the idea that they are trying to have the Winchesters in a sense right the wrongs of Cain and Abel and are attempting to restore "brotherhood" in some way. TPTB may not have drawn very clear connections between Sam and Abel the way they have between Dean and Cain but there is clearly one way in which the Winchesters are NOT like their biblical counterparts (and kinsmen); Sam is still alive and did not give in to Lucifer's temptation AND Dean didn't kill him, he supported him and it saved the world and each other. Very good observation!
Vashti
# Vashti 2014-01-26 21:58
I really don't think there's anything I can add either to your (as always) intellegent and thoughtful review, or to the comments already written.

I have always felt somewhat embaressed and uneasy about my intense attraction to this show and to all the talented and committed people who make it so compelling. Since I have been following this site and reading the serious and analytical articles from your contributors, I feel more comfortable about my place in a community of fans that includes people of such discernment and maturity.

Thank you.
Vashti
# Vashti 2014-01-26 21:58
I really don't think there's anything I can add either to your (as always) intellegent and thoughtful review, or to the comments already written.

I have always felt somewhat embaressed and uneasy about my intense attraction to this show and to all the talented and committed people who make it so compelling. Since I have been following this site and reading the serious and analytical articles from your contributors, I feel more comfortable about my place in a community of fans that includes people of such discernment and maturity.

Thank you.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 22:10
Quoting Vashti:
I really don't think there's anything I can add either to your (as always) intellegent and thoughtful review, or to the comments already written.

I have always felt somewhat embaressed and uneasy about my intense attraction to this show and to all the talented and committed people who make it so compelling. Since I have been following this site and reading the serious and analytical articles from your contributors, I feel more comfortable about my place in a community of fans that includes people of such discernment and maturity.

Thank you.


Thanks for the comment.

I'm glad you enjoyed my review here.

I'm glad you've found your fandom home here at The Winchester Family Business. I can't ever thank Alice enough for setting it up and allowing me to write for it.

There's nothing to be ashamed of by being into this show. None. There is a book that discusses just this topic entitled Fangasm written by a couple of our very own in the Supernatural Family. Look up Fangasm: Supernatural Fangirls by Katherine Larsen and Lynn S, Zubernis on Amazon if you're interested. It's a worthy read.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-26 22:10
Quote:
I really don't think there's anything I can add either to your (as always) intellegent and thoughtful review, or to the comments already written.

I have always felt somewhat embaressed and uneasy about my intense attraction to this show and to all the talented and committed people who make it so compelling. Since I have been following this site and reading the serious and analytical articles from your contributors, I feel more comfortable about my place in a community of fans that includes people of such discernment and maturity.

Thank you.
Thanks for the comment.

I'm glad you enjoyed my review here.

I'm glad you've found your fandom home here at The Winchester Family Business. I can't ever thank Alice enough for setting it up and allowing me to write for it.

There's nothing to be ashamed of by being into this show. None. There is a book that discusses just this topic entitled Fangasm written by a couple of our very own in the Supernatural Family. Look up Fangasm: Supernatural Fangirls by Katherine Larsen and Lynn S, Zubernis on Amazon if you're interested. It's a worthy read.

Thanks again.
Abby S
# Abby S 2014-01-26 22:32
Quoting Vashti:
I really don't think there's anything I can add either to your (as always) intellegent and thoughtful review, or to the comments already written.

I have always felt somewhat embaressed and uneasy about my intense attraction to this show and to all the talented and committed people who make it so compelling. Since I have been following this site and reading the serious and analytical articles from your contributors, I feel more comfortable about my place in a community of fans that includes people of such discernment and maturity.

Thank you.


Yes, Vashti thank you for saying this so perfectly! I know what you mean about being a bit embarrassed about loving a show so much!!!!
I mean it's just a show right? I watch it the episodes alone, I don't talk about it to anyone in my family or with my friends. They just don't get it.
I've got a career, a life - so I shouldn't obsess over something as silly as a TV show, right?
Wrong.
This is something so much more than a TV show, and those that come to this website know it.
The reviewers know it and their writings reflect that depth and analysis.
That's why I appreciate coming here as much as you do, it is why I've actually found the "courage" to post. Always been a lurker.
Abby S
# Abby S 2014-01-26 22:32
Quote:
I really don't think there's anything I can add either to your (as always) intellegent and thoughtful review, or to the comments already written.

I have always felt somewhat embaressed and uneasy about my intense attraction to this show and to all the talented and committed people who make it so compelling. Since I have been following this site and reading the serious and analytical articles from your contributors, I feel more comfortable about my place in a community of fans that includes people of such discernment and maturity.

Thank you.
Yes, Vashti thank you for saying this so perfectly! I know what you mean about being a bit embarrassed about loving a show so much!!!!
I mean it's just a show right? I watch it the episodes alone, I don't talk about it to anyone in my family or with my friends. They just don't get it.
I've got a career, a life - so I shouldn't obsess over something as silly as a TV show, right?
Wrong.
This is something so much more than a TV show, and those that come to this website know it.
The reviewers know it and their writings reflect that depth and analysis.
That's why I appreciate coming here as much as you do, it is why I've actually found the "courage" to post. Always been a lurker.
percysowner
# percysowner 2014-01-27 00:00
I really enjoy all of your reviews. They are very thoughtful and bring out points that I hadn't noticed.

I do have a dispute with this
Quote:
Cain clearly reflects Dean Winchester beautifully. Cain is the older brother. In this interpretation, we can tell---despite his violent action---that he clearly loved his brother. He was put into a difficult situation with no winning choice. Either he allowed Abel to be tricked into becoming an evil being by Lucifer, posing as God, or he took his brother's place---and life.
Cain truly believes that he had no winning choice. He also is clear that Abel hadn't said yes to whatever Lucifer was asking. Lucifer wanted Abel as his pet, Abel had not become that pet. What Cain did was twofold. He first decided that there was no way in the world that Abel would make the right choice. The fact that Cain could see the right choice was only because Cain was better than Abel. He didn't trust Abel, just as Dean didn't trust Sam to make the "right" choice when he was possessed by Gadreel. The second thing is that he murdered Abel, not for what he had done, but for what he might do. He really echoes John here with his "kill Sam or save Sam" command. John never once considered telling Sam what was going on and trusting him to save himself. Cain's story doesn't involve talking to Abel, or finding out Abel's POV. He just murders him and takes away any choice Abel might have had. Cain's distrust in Abel damned Cain and killed Abel when trust might have saved them both.

Quote:
Cain is punished for this crime. God tells him, “What have you done? Listen! Your brother’s blood cries out to me from the ground.Now you are under a curse and driven from the ground, which opened its mouth to receive your brother’s blood from your hand. When you work the ground, it will no longer yield its crops for you. You will be a restless wanderer on the earth.”
After telling Dean and Crowley to leave Cain returns from his errands in town carrying produce and corn in a grocery bag. Perhaps a nod to his continued inability to grow crops?
percysowner
# percysowner 2014-01-27 00:00
I really enjoy all of your reviews. They are very thoughtful and bring out points that I hadn't noticed.

I do have a dispute with this
Quote:
Cain clearly reflects Dean Winchester beautifully. Cain is the older brother. In this interpretation, we can tell---despite his violent action---that he clearly loved his brother. He was put into a difficult situation with no winning choice. Either he allowed Abel to be tricked into becoming an evil being by Lucifer, posing as God, or he took his brother's place---and life.
Cain truly believes that he had no winning choice. He also is clear that Abel hadn't said yes to whatever Lucifer was asking. Lucifer wanted Abel as his pet, Abel had not become that pet. What Cain did was twofold. He first decided that there was no way in the world that Abel would make the right choice. The fact that Cain could see the right choice was only because Cain was better than Abel. He didn't trust Abel, just as Dean didn't trust Sam to make the "right" choice when he was possessed by Gadreel. The second thing is that he murdered Abel, not for what he had done, but for what he might do. He really echoes John here with his "kill Sam or save Sam" command. John never once considered telling Sam what was going on and trusting him to save himself. Cain's story doesn't involve talking to Abel, or finding out Abel's POV. He just murders him and takes away any choice Abel might have had. Cain's distrust in Abel damned Cain and killed Abel when trust might have saved them both.

Quote:
Cain is punished for this crime. God tells him, “What have you done? Listen! Your brother’s blood cries out to me from the ground.Now you are under a curse and driven from the ground, which opened its mouth to receive your brother’s blood from your hand. When you work the ground, it will no longer yield its crops for you. You will be a restless wanderer on the earth.”
After telling Dean and Crowley to leave Cain returns from his errands in town carrying produce and corn in a grocery bag. Perhaps a nod to his continued inability to grow crops?
JuliaG
# JuliaG 2014-01-27 00:22
"It's just who he is" regarding Dean. Does that mean he can't be better? We all understand why Dean did what he did, but it doesn't matter to me if he did it because he can't let Sam go or can't deal with the failure of not protecting his brother. The effect is the same on Sam. But does it matter? Should he he just accept whatever Dean deems necessary where he is concerned just because Dean acts out of love?

What if, in the wake of Season 4, Sam had reasoned that it was just the way he was, he was infected with demon blood after all, and decided not to do anything about it? When does someone's childhood stop being used as an excuse for bad behavior?

I'm sorry, there seems to be this sentiment that Dean is still a hero in season 9, that he was justified in "saving" Sam, and that Sam is still the one in the wrong, hence the Cain/Abel parallel. I don't see it that way at all. To me, Dean is the one who has been consistently wrong this season and he's the one flirting with evil right now. I think (hope!) that Sam will save him in the end.

I apologize Far Away Eyes for my far less than positive ramblings. I came into the fandom during Season 4, at the height of the Sam is EVIL phase and it's SO frustrating to me to see all this sympathy and understanding thrown Dean's way this year. I remember the season premiere and Sam's desperate plea to Death not to be brought back via supernatural means, his exhausted face and hope to never be the instrument of death again. And that's exactly what happened.

I seem to be at odds with most of the fandom. Most are trying to excuse Dean's actions and all I can think about is the violation of Sam's personhood on the most basic level, and the way he looked at the end of 9.1, walking stiffly by Dean: like a walking corpse, only alive because Dean wants it.

God, I really sound melodramatic but that's the way I feel. I need a break from fandom I think.
JuliaG
# JuliaG 2014-01-27 00:22
"It's just who he is" regarding Dean. Does that mean he can't be better? We all understand why Dean did what he did, but it doesn't matter to me if he did it because he can't let Sam go or can't deal with the failure of not protecting his brother. The effect is the same on Sam. But does it matter? Should he he just accept whatever Dean deems necessary where he is concerned just because Dean acts out of love?

What if, in the wake of Season 4, Sam had reasoned that it was just the way he was, he was infected with demon blood after all, and decided not to do anything about it? When does someone's childhood stop being used as an excuse for bad behavior?

I'm sorry, there seems to be this sentiment that Dean is still a hero in season 9, that he was justified in "saving" Sam, and that Sam is still the one in the wrong, hence the Cain/Abel parallel. I don't see it that way at all. To me, Dean is the one who has been consistently wrong this season and he's the one flirting with evil right now. I think (hope!) that Sam will save him in the end.

I apologize Far Away Eyes for my far less than positive ramblings. I came into the fandom during Season 4, at the height of the Sam is EVIL phase and it's SO frustrating to me to see all this sympathy and understanding thrown Dean's way this year. I remember the season premiere and Sam's desperate plea to Death not to be brought back via supernatural means, his exhausted face and hope to never be the instrument of death again. And that's exactly what happened.

I seem to be at odds with most of the fandom. Most are trying to excuse Dean's actions and all I can think about is the violation of Sam's personhood on the most basic level, and the way he looked at the end of 9.1, walking stiffly by Dean: like a walking corpse, only alive because Dean wants it.

God, I really sound melodramatic but that's the way I feel. I need a break from fandom I think.
anonymousN
# anonymousN 2014-01-27 07:46
Quoting percysowner:
I really enjoy all of your reviews. They are very thoughtful and bring out points that I hadn't noticed.

I do have a dispute with this
Quote:
Cain clearly reflects Dean Winchester beautifully. Cain is the older brother. In this interpretation, we can tell---despite his violent action---that he clearly loved his brother. He was put into a difficult situation with no winning choice. Either he allowed Abel to be tricked into becoming an evil being by Lucifer, posing as God, or he took his brother's place---and life.


Cain truly believes that he had no winning choice. He also is clear that Abel hadn't said yes to whatever Lucifer was asking. Lucifer wanted Abel as his pet, Abel had not become that pet. What Cain did was twofold. He first decided that there was no way in the world that Abel would make the right choice. The fact that Cain could see the right choice was only because Cain was better than Abel. He didn't trust Abel, just as Dean didn't trust Sam to make the "right" choice when he was possessed by Gadreel. The second thing is that he murdered Abel, not for what he had done, but for what he might do. He really echoes John here with his "kill Sam or save Sam" command. John never once considered telling Sam what was going on and trusting him to save himself. Cain's story doesn't involve talking to Abel, or finding out Abel's POV. He just murders him and takes away any choice Abel might have had. Cain's distrust in Abel damned Cain and killed Abel when trust might have saved them both.

Quote:
Cain is punished for this crime. God tells him, “What have you done? Listen! Your brother’s blood cries out to me from the ground.Now you are under a curse and driven from the ground, which opened its mouth to receive your brother’s blood from your hand. When you work the ground, it will no longer yield its crops for you. You will be a restless wanderer on the earth.”
I did not comment about Cain's story because it was half of the story..and I think going by the past records i will have to wait for Abel's story if there will be for some time.I have not commented on this episode because it felt meh may be a future episode (may be a companion episode) will give it a different color.
I loved your review Far Away Eyes .Thank you.
anonymousN
# anonymousN 2014-01-27 07:46
Quote:
I really enjoy all of your reviews. They are very thoughtful and bring out points that I hadn't noticed.

I do have a dispute with this
Quote:
Cain clearly reflects Dean Winchester beautifully. Cain is the older brother. In this interpretation, we can tell---despite his violent action---that he clearly loved his brother. He was put into a difficult situation with no winning choice. Either he allowed Abel to be tricked into becoming an evil being by Lucifer, posing as God, or he took his brother's place---and life.
Cain truly believes that he had no winning choice. He also is clear that Abel hadn't said yes to whatever Lucifer was asking. Lucifer wanted Abel as his pet, Abel had not become that pet. What Cain did was twofold. He first decided that there was no way in the world that Abel would make the right choice. The fact that Cain could see the right choice was only because Cain was better than Abel. He didn't trust Abel, just as Dean didn't trust Sam to make the "right" choice when he was possessed by Gadreel. The second thing is that he murdered Abel, not for what he had done, but for what he might do. He really echoes John here with his "kill Sam or save Sam" command. John never once considered telling Sam what was going on and trusting him to save himself. Cain's story doesn't involve talking to Abel, or finding out Abel's POV. He just murders him and takes away any choice Abel might have had. Cain's distrust in Abel damned Cain and killed Abel when trust might have saved them both.

Quote:
Cain is punished for this crime. God tells him, “What have you done? Listen! Your brother’s blood cries out to me from the ground.Now you are under a curse and driven from the ground, which opened its mouth to receive your brother’s blood from your hand. When you work the ground, it will no longer yield its crops for you. You will be a restless wanderer on the earth.”
I did not comment about Cain's story because it was half of the story..and I think going by the past records i will have to wait for Abel's story if there will be for some time.I have not commented on this episode because it felt meh may be a future episode (may be a companion episode) will give it a different color.
I loved your review Far Away Eyes .Thank you.
anonymousN
# anonymousN 2014-01-27 08:02
Quoting JuliaG:
"It's just who he is" regarding Dean. Does that mean he can't be better? We all understand why Dean did what he did, but it doesn't matter to me if he did it because he can't let Sam go or can't deal with the failure of not protecting his brother. The effect is the same on Sam. But does it matter? Should he he just accept whatever Dean deems necessary where he is concerned just because Dean acts out of love?

What if, in the wake of Season 4, Sam had reasoned that it was just the way he was, he was infected with demon blood after all, and decided not to do anything about it? When does someone's childhood stop being used as an excuse for bad behavior?

I'm sorry, there seems to be this sentiment that Dean is still a hero in season 9, that he was justified in "saving" Sam, and that Sam is still the one in the wrong, hence the Cain/Abel parallel. I don't see it that way at all. To me, Dean is the one who has been consistently wrong this season and he's the one flirting with evil right now. I think (hope!) that Sam will save him in the end.

I apologize Far Away Eyes for my far less than positive ramblings. I came into the fandom during Season 4, at the height of the Sam is EVIL phase and it's SO frustrating to me to see all this sympathy and understanding thrown Dean's way this year. I remember the season premiere and Sam's desperate plea to Death not to be brought back via supernatural means, his exhausted face and hope to never be the instrument of death again. And that's exactly what happened.

I seem to be at odds with most of the fandom. Most are trying to excuse Dean's actions and all I can think about is the violation of Sam's personhood on the most basic level, and the way he looked at the end of 9.1, walking stiffly by Dean: like a walking corpse, only alive because Dean wants it.

God, I really sound melodramatic but that's the way I feel. I need a break from fandom I think.

I entered the online fandom at around season 4 and i get you.I kind of understand the sympathy shown as the tptb have shown more concern while unraveling Dean after the aftermath of his controversial decision,the situation surrounding it and depicting the scenario as a whole .They did not keep it a secret for long from us heck we were seeing his decisions real time not after half the season.Also when Sam came to know the immediate next episode we have a Character tell Sam (I think repeatedly) to get help from Dean and be all sympathetic to them and their decisions which for Sam's case are a little too late .None of which Sam got in season 4.
It was all how dare you do that Sam?Well guess what he was alone..no Cas or Cas like being...only Ruby.And I know how that turned out.
I don't know whether you and I are melodramatic but let me tell you, I get you.
anonymousN
# anonymousN 2014-01-27 08:02
Quote:
"It's just who he is" regarding Dean. Does that mean he can't be better? We all understand why Dean did what he did, but it doesn't matter to me if he did it because he can't let Sam go or can't deal with the failure of not protecting his brother. The effect is the same on Sam. But does it matter? Should he he just accept whatever Dean deems necessary where he is concerned just because Dean acts out of love?

What if, in the wake of Season 4, Sam had reasoned that it was just the way he was, he was infected with demon blood after all, and decided not to do anything about it? When does someone's childhood stop being used as an excuse for bad behavior?

I'm sorry, there seems to be this sentiment that Dean is still a hero in season 9, that he was justified in "saving" Sam, and that Sam is still the one in the wrong, hence the Cain/Abel parallel. I don't see it that way at all. To me, Dean is the one who has been consistently wrong this season and he's the one flirting with evil right now. I think (hope!) that Sam will save him in the end.

I apologize Far Away Eyes for my far less than positive ramblings. I came into the fandom during Season 4, at the height of the Sam is EVIL phase and it's SO frustrating to me to see all this sympathy and understanding thrown Dean's way this year. I remember the season premiere and Sam's desperate plea to Death not to be brought back via supernatural means, his exhausted face and hope to never be the instrument of death again. And that's exactly what happened.

I seem to be at odds with most of the fandom. Most are trying to excuse Dean's actions and all I can think about is the violation of Sam's personhood on the most basic level, and the way he looked at the end of 9.1, walking stiffly by Dean: like a walking corpse, only alive because Dean wants it.

God, I really sound melodramatic but that's the way I feel. I need a break from fandom I think.
I entered the online fandom at around season 4 and i get you.I kind of understand the sympathy shown as the tptb have shown more concern while unraveling Dean after the aftermath of his controversial decision,the situation surrounding it and depicting the scenario as a whole .They did not keep it a secret for long from us heck we were seeing his decisions real time not after half the season.Also when Sam came to know the immediate next episode we have a Character tell Sam (I think repeatedly) to get help from Dean and be all sympathetic to them and their decisions which for Sam's case are a little too late .None of which Sam got in season 4.
It was all how dare you do that Sam?Well guess what he was alone..no Cas or Cas like being...only Ruby.And I know how that turned out.
I don't know whether you and I are melodramatic but let me tell you, I get you.
Sylvie
# Sylvie 2014-01-27 08:46
Thank you once again for a great review! I really love Robbie Thompson, I feel like he is the voice of fandom. He deals with the canon so well. Making Sam & Dean the reflection of Cain and Abel is genius and brings us back to what Michael said to Dean in season five. I really liked Timothy Omundson, he played the role so very well. He was fearless and deadly but also very sympathetic and so kind to his wife, and boy could he read Dean like an open book. Crowley and Dean make such a great team! :lol: But, oh Dean, I am so very worried about what the mark of Cain will mean for him going into the future. :-? The power of the fight scene in the kitchen was so well done, Jensen Ackles was just so great. Kudos to John Badham for the direction.

I also loved Castiel with Sam and do hope that we see them together like this again. I think Castiel will manage to make Sam understand why Dean did what he did, and that Sam will ultimately forgive him, it's just in his nature IMO.

Have I mentioned how much I'm loving this season? :-)
Sylvie
# Sylvie 2014-01-27 08:46
Thank you once again for a great review! I really love Robbie Thompson, I feel like he is the voice of fandom. He deals with the canon so well. Making Sam & Dean the reflection of Cain and Abel is genius and brings us back to what Michael said to Dean in season five. I really liked Timothy Omundson, he played the role so very well. He was fearless and deadly but also very sympathetic and so kind to his wife, and boy could he read Dean like an open book. Crowley and Dean make such a great team! :lol: But, oh Dean, I am so very worried about what the mark of Cain will mean for him going into the future. :-? The power of the fight scene in the kitchen was so well done, Jensen Ackles was just so great. Kudos to John Badham for the direction.

I also loved Castiel with Sam and do hope that we see them together like this again. I think Castiel will manage to make Sam understand why Dean did what he did, and that Sam will ultimately forgive him, it's just in his nature IMO.

Have I mentioned how much I'm loving this season? :-)
mary9930
# mary9930 2014-01-27 10:18
Thank you Far Away Eyes for not only your insightful reviews but for your kind responses to every comment.

Don't every leave us! I fear we would feel a disturbance in the force and go to the dark side :)
mary9930
# mary9930 2014-01-27 10:18
Thank you Far Away Eyes for not only your insightful reviews but for your kind responses to every comment.

Don't every leave us! I fear we would feel a disturbance in the force and go to the dark side :)
eilf
# eilf 2014-01-27 12:19
Quoting JuliaG:
"It's just who he is" regarding Dean. Does that mean he can't be better? We all understand why Dean did what he did, but it doesn't matter to me if he did it because he can't let Sam go or can't deal with the failure of not protecting his brother. The effect is the same on Sam. But does it matter? Should he he just accept whatever Dean deems necessary where he is concerned just because Dean acts out of love?

What if, in the wake of Season 4, Sam had reasoned that it was just the way he was, he was infected with demon blood after all, and decided not to do anything about it? When does someone's childhood stop being used as an excuse for bad behavior?

I'm sorry, there seems to be this sentiment that Dean is still a hero in season 9, that he was justified in "saving" Sam, and that Sam is still the one in the wrong, hence the Cain/Abel parallel. I don't see it that way at all. To me, Dean is the one who has been consistently wrong this season and he's the one flirting with evil right now. I think (hope!) that Sam will save him in the end.

I apologize Far Away Eyes for my far less than positive ramblings. I came into the fandom during Season 4, at the height of the Sam is EVIL phase and it's SO frustrating to me to see all this sympathy and understanding thrown Dean's way this year. I remember the season premiere and Sam's desperate plea to Death not to be brought back via supernatural means, his exhausted face and hope to never be the instrument of death again. And that's exactly what happened.

I seem to be at odds with most of the fandom. Most are trying to excuse Dean's actions and all I can think about is the violation of Sam's personhood on the most basic level, and the way he looked at the end of 9.1, walking stiffly by Dean: like a walking corpse, only alive because Dean wants it.

God, I really sound melodramatic but that's the way I feel. I need a break from fandom I think.


Hi JuliaG It's frustrating, isn't it? ;-) No you aren't alone in this interpretation.
eilf
# eilf 2014-01-27 12:19
Quote:
"It's just who he is" regarding Dean. Does that mean he can't be better? We all understand why Dean did what he did, but it doesn't matter to me if he did it because he can't let Sam go or can't deal with the failure of not protecting his brother. The effect is the same on Sam. But does it matter? Should he he just accept whatever Dean deems necessary where he is concerned just because Dean acts out of love?

What if, in the wake of Season 4, Sam had reasoned that it was just the way he was, he was infected with demon blood after all, and decided not to do anything about it? When does someone's childhood stop being used as an excuse for bad behavior?

I'm sorry, there seems to be this sentiment that Dean is still a hero in season 9, that he was justified in "saving" Sam, and that Sam is still the one in the wrong, hence the Cain/Abel parallel. I don't see it that way at all. To me, Dean is the one who has been consistently wrong this season and he's the one flirting with evil right now. I think (hope!) that Sam will save him in the end.

I apologize Far Away Eyes for my far less than positive ramblings. I came into the fandom during Season 4, at the height of the Sam is EVIL phase and it's SO frustrating to me to see all this sympathy and understanding thrown Dean's way this year. I remember the season premiere and Sam's desperate plea to Death not to be brought back via supernatural means, his exhausted face and hope to never be the instrument of death again. And that's exactly what happened.

I seem to be at odds with most of the fandom. Most are trying to excuse Dean's actions and all I can think about is the violation of Sam's personhood on the most basic level, and the way he looked at the end of 9.1, walking stiffly by Dean: like a walking corpse, only alive because Dean wants it.

God, I really sound melodramatic but that's the way I feel. I need a break from fandom I think.
Hi JuliaG It's frustrating, isn't it? ;-) No you aren't alone in this interpretation.
suenash19
# suenash19 2014-01-27 14:44
I totally get what you are saying JuliaG. I have to say, I don't read too many reviews though.

I adored season 4 and Sam's intense emotional experience following his bleak glimpse of the future without Dean in Mystery Spot. I thought it was so well told. The fact that we seem to get more back story and sympathy for where Dean is coming from doesn't spoil it for me.

I can honestly say that on the rare occasion when I haven't liked an episode as much as usual it has still been good telly that has compared favourably with anything else on. E.g. Sex and Violence- not my fave by a long way but salvaged by the tension between the brothers and -ok- Sam's back muscles etc. now,before I get too distracted, I am just saying - I understand the frustration you are voicing, but for me it doesn't spoil the beautifully crafted work of art that is Supernatural xx
suenash19
# suenash19 2014-01-27 14:44
I totally get what you are saying JuliaG. I have to say, I don't read too many reviews though.

I adored season 4 and Sam's intense emotional experience following his bleak glimpse of the future without Dean in Mystery Spot. I thought it was so well told. The fact that we seem to get more back story and sympathy for where Dean is coming from doesn't spoil it for me.

I can honestly say that on the rare occasion when I haven't liked an episode as much as usual it has still been good telly that has compared favourably with anything else on. E.g. Sex and Violence- not my fave by a long way but salvaged by the tension between the brothers and -ok- Sam's back muscles etc. now,before I get too distracted, I am just saying - I understand the frustration you are voicing, but for me it doesn't spoil the beautifully crafted work of art that is Supernatural xx
lkeke35
# lkeke35 2014-01-27 14:59
@40 JuliaG

CHeck out the top two metas here for some insight into what you're feeling. You're not alone in thinking this. Plenty of others are having the same issues with the text:

http://spn-heavymeta.livejournal.com/
lkeke35
# lkeke35 2014-01-27 14:59
@40 JuliaG

CHeck out the top two metas here for some insight into what you're feeling. You're not alone in thinking this. Plenty of others are having the same issues with the text:

http://spn-heavymeta.livejournal.com/
reedmac
# reedmac 2014-01-27 15:20
First of all I saw the Mark of Cain as a curse not as some kind of reward for being a good brother, that would make no sense since Cain wasn't a good brother even though he probably thinks he was.

In giving the Mark to Dean Cain unburdens himself of it, maybe when the time comes and Cain calls on Dean to kill him Cain will finally be allowed in heaven?

Also I think that given that Cain seemed to know quite a bit about Sam and Dean he choice Dean to pass the Mark onto because unlike Cain himself Dean has a brother who is alive, a brother who saved himself from Lucifer's temptation and whom Dean helped to do so. Dean has a brother who isn't Abel and who Dean believed in enough to not just kill because he couldn't find it in himself to trust his brother and talk to him. Maybe he gave the Mark to Dean because unlike Cain Dean has a brother who is going to save him and is going to life the curse of the Mark from Dean. Maybe Dean is worthy because he has Sam as a brother.

Looking forward to seeing Sam save Dean when Dean goes dark, I just hope they go really dark or it will be kinda pointless. I want to see Sam pulling Dean back from the edge of losing his humanity and I want to see Sam use his brilliant hunter brain to do it. I hope this is Carver's way of making it up to Sam fans and Jared for last seasons totally OCC first half storyline, it would go a long way to help fix Sam' issues of inadequacy when it comes to doing the right thing and saving Dean. Then next season Dean's storyline can be his seeking redemption while Sam takes the mantle of the stronger brother for a while.
reedmac
# reedmac 2014-01-27 15:20
First of all I saw the Mark of Cain as a curse not as some kind of reward for being a good brother, that would make no sense since Cain wasn't a good brother even though he probably thinks he was.

In giving the Mark to Dean Cain unburdens himself of it, maybe when the time comes and Cain calls on Dean to kill him Cain will finally be allowed in heaven?

Also I think that given that Cain seemed to know quite a bit about Sam and Dean he choice Dean to pass the Mark onto because unlike Cain himself Dean has a brother who is alive, a brother who saved himself from Lucifer's temptation and whom Dean helped to do so. Dean has a brother who isn't Abel and who Dean believed in enough to not just kill because he couldn't find it in himself to trust his brother and talk to him. Maybe he gave the Mark to Dean because unlike Cain Dean has a brother who is going to save him and is going to life the curse of the Mark from Dean. Maybe Dean is worthy because he has Sam as a brother.

Looking forward to seeing Sam save Dean when Dean goes dark, I just hope they go really dark or it will be kinda pointless. I want to see Sam pulling Dean back from the edge of losing his humanity and I want to see Sam use his brilliant hunter brain to do it. I hope this is Carver's way of making it up to Sam fans and Jared for last seasons totally OCC first half storyline, it would go a long way to help fix Sam' issues of inadequacy when it comes to doing the right thing and saving Dean. Then next season Dean's storyline can be his seeking redemption while Sam takes the mantle of the stronger brother for a while.
reedmac
# reedmac 2014-01-27 15:46
@ #47

Thanks for that it was perhaps the most coherent and thought provoking article on the subject of Sam and Dean right now as I have read on the entire web.

It made me rethink the whole situation.

Also I love the idea that one of the brothers is possessed by Abaddon at the end of the season, they've been dropping hints about Dean being the vessel from the beginning of the season and the thought that Sam would then have to save Dean from such a violation, a Dean at his strongest and most evil is an exciting prospect. More so then having Sam float along all season while Dean goes dark just to give a speech in the finale that pulls Dean back to the light or even certainly less unoriginal than having Sam being possessed by Abaddon and Dean having to deal with the possibility of killing Sam/Abaddon. Wouldn't it be something if the writers finally allowed Sam to get the win for the team by taking down Abaddon/kicking her ass and saving Dean in the process? Now that would be worth watching.
reedmac
# reedmac 2014-01-27 15:46
@ #47

Thanks for that it was perhaps the most coherent and thought provoking article on the subject of Sam and Dean right now as I have read on the entire web.

It made me rethink the whole situation.

Also I love the idea that one of the brothers is possessed by Abaddon at the end of the season, they've been dropping hints about Dean being the vessel from the beginning of the season and the thought that Sam would then have to save Dean from such a violation, a Dean at his strongest and most evil is an exciting prospect. More so then having Sam float along all season while Dean goes dark just to give a speech in the finale that pulls Dean back to the light or even certainly less unoriginal than having Sam being possessed by Abaddon and Dean having to deal with the possibility of killing Sam/Abaddon. Wouldn't it be something if the writers finally allowed Sam to get the win for the team by taking down Abaddon/kicking her ass and saving Dean in the process? Now that would be worth watching.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 18:15
Quoting Sylvie:
Thank you once again for a great review! I really love Robbie Thompson, I feel like he is the voice of fandom. He deals with the canon so well. Making Sam & Dean the reflection of Cain and Abel is genius and brings us back to what Michael said to Dean in season five. I really liked Timothy Omundson, he played the role so very well. He was fearless and deadly but also very sympathetic and so kind to his wife, and boy could he read Dean like an open book. Crowley and Dean make such a great team! :lol: But, oh Dean, I am so very worried about what the mark of Cain will mean for him going into the future. :-? The power of the fight scene in the kitchen was so well done, Jensen Ackles was just so great. Kudos to John Badham for the direction.

I also loved Castiel with Sam and do hope that we see them together like this again. I think Castiel will manage to make Sam understand why Dean did what he did, and that Sam will ultimately forgive him, it's just in his nature IMO.

Have I mentioned how much I'm loving this season? :-)



Thanks for the comment.

I'm glad you enjoyed my interpretation of this episode.

I think Robbie Thompson is my favorite writer on the staff currently. I find myself connecting with his episodes on many levels and I liked how he handled pairing Castiel with Sam in their scenes and Crowley with Dean in theirs. It made it seem a bit fresh and allowed us to see something different from a different perspective that gave us some answers and raised some questions.

I'm not sure that Sam will forgive Dean just yet. I'm thinking it may take a few episodes or possibly the remainder of the season for us to see that happen. I think it may even be a thread we see lace through the story as we go forward. It's not something that should be forgiven easily after all.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 18:15
Quote:
Thank you once again for a great review! I really love Robbie Thompson, I feel like he is the voice of fandom. He deals with the canon so well. Making Sam & Dean the reflection of Cain and Abel is genius and brings us back to what Michael said to Dean in season five. I really liked Timothy Omundson, he played the role so very well. He was fearless and deadly but also very sympathetic and so kind to his wife, and boy could he read Dean like an open book. Crowley and Dean make such a great team! :lol: But, oh Dean, I am so very worried about what the mark of Cain will mean for him going into the future. :-? The power of the fight scene in the kitchen was so well done, Jensen Ackles was just so great. Kudos to John Badham for the direction.

I also loved Castiel with Sam and do hope that we see them together like this again. I think Castiel will manage to make Sam understand why Dean did what he did, and that Sam will ultimately forgive him, it's just in his nature IMO.

Have I mentioned how much I'm loving this season? :-)
Thanks for the comment.

I'm glad you enjoyed my interpretation of this episode.

I think Robbie Thompson is my favorite writer on the staff currently. I find myself connecting with his episodes on many levels and I liked how he handled pairing Castiel with Sam in their scenes and Crowley with Dean in theirs. It made it seem a bit fresh and allowed us to see something different from a different perspective that gave us some answers and raised some questions.

I'm not sure that Sam will forgive Dean just yet. I'm thinking it may take a few episodes or possibly the remainder of the season for us to see that happen. I think it may even be a thread we see lace through the story as we go forward. It's not something that should be forgiven easily after all.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 18:16
Quoting mary9930:
Thank you Far Away Eyes for not only your insightful reviews but for your kind responses to every comment.

Don't every leave us! I fear we would feel a disturbance in the force and go to the dark side :)



Thanks so much.

I'm glad you enjoyed my review and that you like that I answer the comments. It's only fair since people were willing to read what I wrote!

I don't plan on going anywhere in the near future, don't worry.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 18:16
Quote:
Thank you Far Away Eyes for not only your insightful reviews but for your kind responses to every comment.

Don't every leave us! I fear we would feel a disturbance in the force and go to the dark side :)
Thanks so much.

I'm glad you enjoyed my review and that you like that I answer the comments. It's only fair since people were willing to read what I wrote!

I don't plan on going anywhere in the near future, don't worry.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 18:22
Quoting reedmac:
First of all I saw the Mark of Cain as a curse not as some kind of reward for being a good brother, that would make no sense since Cain wasn't a good brother even though he probably thinks he was.

In giving the Mark to Dean Cain unburdens himself of it, maybe when the time comes and Cain calls on Dean to kill him Cain will finally be allowed in heaven?

Also I think that given that Cain seemed to know quite a bit about Sam and Dean he choice Dean to pass the Mark onto because unlike Cain himself Dean has a brother who is alive, a brother who saved himself from Lucifer's temptation and whom Dean helped to do so. Dean has a brother who isn't Abel and who Dean believed in enough to not just kill because he couldn't find it in himself to trust his brother and talk to him. Maybe he gave the Mark to Dean because unlike Cain Dean has a brother who is going to save him and is going to life the curse of the Mark from Dean. Maybe Dean is worthy because he has Sam as a brother.

Looking forward to seeing Sam save Dean when Dean goes dark, I just hope they go really dark or it will be kinda pointless. I want to see Sam pulling Dean back from the edge of losing his humanity and I want to see Sam use his brilliant hunter brain to do it. I hope this is Carver's way of making it up to Sam fans and Jared for last seasons totally OCC first half storyline, it would go a long way to help fix Sam' issues of inadequacy when it comes to doing the right thing and saving Dean. Then next season Dean's storyline can be his seeking redemption while Sam takes the mantle of the stronger brother for a while.


Thanks for the comment.

I haven't ventured into any spoilers so I don't know anything about what's planned or not, but I can see any of these scenarios being possible.

I don't think receiving the Mark is necessarily a good thing or a "reward," either. I think Cain saw a lot of himself---and that second chance that a pair of brothers may have that Cain and Abel didn't---and so found Dean worthy that way.

That being said, I think the fact that Dean didn't ask what the burden was or what it will mean down the road will come back to bite him in the ass. It's clear that this Mark isn't going to just give Dean the ability to use the First Blade. It's going to do something else to him, and whatever that is will not always be a good thing.

I look forward to where they take it and how they explore the effects of the Mark and how it relates to the brotherhood. I found, as much as this episode answered some things for me, it raised a lot more questions and things to consider. I'm hopeful we'll see how those are handled as we go further into the season.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 18:22
Quote:
First of all I saw the Mark of Cain as a curse not as some kind of reward for being a good brother, that would make no sense since Cain wasn't a good brother even though he probably thinks he was.

In giving the Mark to Dean Cain unburdens himself of it, maybe when the time comes and Cain calls on Dean to kill him Cain will finally be allowed in heaven?

Also I think that given that Cain seemed to know quite a bit about Sam and Dean he choice Dean to pass the Mark onto because unlike Cain himself Dean has a brother who is alive, a brother who saved himself from Lucifer's temptation and whom Dean helped to do so. Dean has a brother who isn't Abel and who Dean believed in enough to not just kill because he couldn't find it in himself to trust his brother and talk to him. Maybe he gave the Mark to Dean because unlike Cain Dean has a brother who is going to save him and is going to life the curse of the Mark from Dean. Maybe Dean is worthy because he has Sam as a brother.

Looking forward to seeing Sam save Dean when Dean goes dark, I just hope they go really dark or it will be kinda pointless. I want to see Sam pulling Dean back from the edge of losing his humanity and I want to see Sam use his brilliant hunter brain to do it. I hope this is Carver's way of making it up to Sam fans and Jared for last seasons totally OCC first half storyline, it would go a long way to help fix Sam' issues of inadequacy when it comes to doing the right thing and saving Dean. Then next season Dean's storyline can be his seeking redemption while Sam takes the mantle of the stronger brother for a while.
Thanks for the comment.

I haven't ventured into any spoilers so I don't know anything about what's planned or not, but I can see any of these scenarios being possible.

I don't think receiving the Mark is necessarily a good thing or a "reward," either. I think Cain saw a lot of himself---and that second chance that a pair of brothers may have that Cain and Abel didn't---and so found Dean worthy that way.

That being said, I think the fact that Dean didn't ask what the burden was or what it will mean down the road will come back to bite him in the ass. It's clear that this Mark isn't going to just give Dean the ability to use the First Blade. It's going to do something else to him, and whatever that is will not always be a good thing.

I look forward to where they take it and how they explore the effects of the Mark and how it relates to the brotherhood. I found, as much as this episode answered some things for me, it raised a lot more questions and things to consider. I'm hopeful we'll see how those are handled as we go further into the season.

Thanks again!
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 18:31
Quoting percysowner:
I really enjoy all of your reviews. They are very thoughtful and bring out points that I hadn't noticed.

I do have a dispute with this
Quote:
Cain clearly reflects Dean Winchester beautifully. Cain is the older brother. In this interpretation, we can tell---despite his violent action---that he clearly loved his brother. He was put into a difficult situation with no winning choice. Either he allowed Abel to be tricked into becoming an evil being by Lucifer, posing as God, or he took his brother's place---and life.


Cain truly believes that he had no winning choice. He also is clear that Abel hadn't said yes to whatever Lucifer was asking. Lucifer wanted Abel as his pet, Abel had not become that pet. What Cain did was twofold. He first decided that there was no way in the world that Abel would make the right choice. The fact that Cain could see the right choice was only because Cain was better than Abel. He didn't trust Abel, just as Dean didn't trust Sam to make the "right" choice when he was possessed by Gadreel. The second thing is that he murdered Abel, not for what he had done, but for what he might do. He really echoes John here with his "kill Sam or save Sam" command. John never once considered telling Sam what was going on and trusting him to save himself. Cain's story doesn't involve talking to Abel, or finding out Abel's POV. He just murders him and takes away any choice Abel might have had. Cain's distrust in Abel damned Cain and killed Abel when trust might have saved them both.

Quote:
Cain is punished for this crime. God tells him, “What have you done? Listen! Your brother’s blood cries out to me from the ground.Now you are under a curse and driven from the ground, which opened its mouth to receive your brother’s blood from your hand. When you work the ground, it will no longer yield its crops for you. You will be a restless wanderer on the earth.”
After telling Dean and Crowley to leave Cain returns from his errands in town carrying produce and corn in a grocery bag. Perhaps a nod to his continued inability to grow crops?
Thanks for the comment.

I can see how Cain also can reflect John here. He was always much more willing to kill Sam if necessary--or at least in commanding Dean do it if that time comes. Cain's character certainly does have that element to it.

Perhaps Sam and Dean are to not only fix what Cain and Abel couldn't---afte r all Sam is alive and therefore able to work on this with his brother---but to also fix the command that came from John to Dean.

I think in many ways that command has been a foundation problem for Dean in regards to Sam. He is so afraid of the "kill him" part of it that he throws himself full on into "save him" and this has created several problems for him---and most importantly Sam. If the brothers can get around this together perhaps we'll see Sam and Dean undo on some level what happened between Cain and Abel. And perhaps put to rest what that command has meant to Dean.

As for the corn, I had the same thought. The bees also seem to fit into this theme. Cain was a farmer, and while being a bee keeper isn't exactly the same thing it's in the same arena so to speak. I think it's also telling that he mentions that the bees are dying---somethi ng necessary for growing food. I thought it was a nice tie into the Cain story and his punishment from God.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 18:31
Quote:
I really enjoy all of your reviews. They are very thoughtful and bring out points that I hadn't noticed.

I do have a dispute with this
Quote:
Cain clearly reflects Dean Winchester beautifully. Cain is the older brother. In this interpretation, we can tell---despite his violent action---that he clearly loved his brother. He was put into a difficult situation with no winning choice. Either he allowed Abel to be tricked into becoming an evil being by Lucifer, posing as God, or he took his brother's place---and life.
Cain truly believes that he had no winning choice. He also is clear that Abel hadn't said yes to whatever Lucifer was asking. Lucifer wanted Abel as his pet, Abel had not become that pet. What Cain did was twofold. He first decided that there was no way in the world that Abel would make the right choice. The fact that Cain could see the right choice was only because Cain was better than Abel. He didn't trust Abel, just as Dean didn't trust Sam to make the "right" choice when he was possessed by Gadreel. The second thing is that he murdered Abel, not for what he had done, but for what he might do. He really echoes John here with his "kill Sam or save Sam" command. John never once considered telling Sam what was going on and trusting him to save himself. Cain's story doesn't involve talking to Abel, or finding out Abel's POV. He just murders him and takes away any choice Abel might have had. Cain's distrust in Abel damned Cain and killed Abel when trust might have saved them both.

Quote:
Cain is punished for this crime. God tells him, “What have you done? Listen! Your brother’s blood cries out to me from the ground.Now you are under a curse and driven from the ground, which opened its mouth to receive your brother’s blood from your hand. When you work the ground, it will no longer yield its crops for you. You will be a restless wanderer on the earth.”
After telling Dean and Crowley to leave Cain returns from his errands in town carrying produce and corn in a grocery bag. Perhaps a nod to his continued inability to grow crops?
Thanks for the comment.

I can see how Cain also can reflect John here. He was always much more willing to kill Sam if necessary--or at least in commanding Dean do it if that time comes. Cain's character certainly does have that element to it.

Perhaps Sam and Dean are to not only fix what Cain and Abel couldn't---afte r all Sam is alive and therefore able to work on this with his brother---but to also fix the command that came from John to Dean.

I think in many ways that command has been a foundation problem for Dean in regards to Sam. He is so afraid of the "kill him" part of it that he throws himself full on into "save him" and this has created several problems for him---and most importantly Sam. If the brothers can get around this together perhaps we'll see Sam and Dean undo on some level what happened between Cain and Abel. And perhaps put to rest what that command has meant to Dean.

As for the corn, I had the same thought. The bees also seem to fit into this theme. Cain was a farmer, and while being a bee keeper isn't exactly the same thing it's in the same arena so to speak. I think it's also telling that he mentions that the bees are dying---somethi ng necessary for growing food. I thought it was a nice tie into the Cain story and his punishment from God.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 18:47
Quoting JuliaG:
"It's just who he is" regarding Dean. Does that mean he can't be better? We all understand why Dean did what he did, but it doesn't matter to me if he did it because he can't let Sam go or can't deal with the failure of not protecting his brother. The effect is the same on Sam. But does it matter? Should he he just accept whatever Dean deems necessary where he is concerned just because Dean acts out of love?

What if, in the wake of Season 4, Sam had reasoned that it was just the way he was, he was infected with demon blood after all, and decided not to do anything about it? When does someone's childhood stop being used as an excuse for bad behavior?

I'm sorry, there seems to be this sentiment that Dean is still a hero in season 9, that he was justified in "saving" Sam, and that Sam is still the one in the wrong, hence the Cain/Abel parallel. I don't see it that way at all. To me, Dean is the one who has been consistently wrong this season and he's the one flirting with evil right now. I think (hope!) that Sam will save him in the end.

I apologize Far Away Eyes for my far less than positive ramblings. I came into the fandom during Season 4, at the height of the Sam is EVIL phase and it's SO frustrating to me to see all this sympathy and understanding thrown Dean's way this year. I remember the season premiere and Sam's desperate plea to Death not to be brought back via supernatural means, his exhausted face and hope to never be the instrument of death again. And that's exactly what happened.

I seem to be at odds with most of the fandom. Most are trying to excuse Dean's actions and all I can think about is the violation of Sam's personhood on the most basic level, and the way he looked at the end of 9.1, walking stiffly by Dean: like a walking corpse, only alive because Dean wants it.

God, I really sound melodramatic but that's the way I feel. I need a break from fandom I think.


Thanks for the comment.

I may not have been around during season 4, but I always found myself sympathizing much more with Sam during that story arc than Dean. Why? Because i understood why Sam was doing what he was doing. He couldn't stop Dean from going to Hell so he decided to do whatever it took to perhaps get revenge and possibly find a way to get Dean back. I've thought that Sam's actions from season 4-now are all tied to that moment in "No Rest for the Wicked" when Dean is sent to Hell and Sam couldn't stop it.

As for the current situation, I'm sympathetic towards both absolutely. Dean was going off of words his brother spoke while doing the Trials---such as "I want to kill a hellhound and not die" and I think the fact that he's always had that command from John ringing in his ears is another driving force in this matter. I feel for him. He's kinda stuck in a time loop of his own in that regard.

That being said, I am so sympathetic towards Sam and how he feels. Dean may have taken Sam's words from while he was doing the Trials, but he ignored Sam's words in that cabin with Death and it cost him a lot. He was not in control of his body nor was he aware of it. That fall out has been heartbreaking for me to watch. I totally understand where he's coming from and how he feels about it and why.

I think, if we were to strip away the supernatural aspects of angels and deals and possession, we'd see that in a lot of ways this story line has us asking questions about end of life decisions. It's always going to be a difficult discussion with people and it will always be divided. I don't think there's ever a right or final answer on the matter, either.

Either way I think we're going to see them have to deal with this both as individuals and as brothers.I think they're going to have to assess what it exactly means for them and how they proceed going forward.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 18:47
Quote:
"It's just who he is" regarding Dean. Does that mean he can't be better? We all understand why Dean did what he did, but it doesn't matter to me if he did it because he can't let Sam go or can't deal with the failure of not protecting his brother. The effect is the same on Sam. But does it matter? Should he he just accept whatever Dean deems necessary where he is concerned just because Dean acts out of love?

What if, in the wake of Season 4, Sam had reasoned that it was just the way he was, he was infected with demon blood after all, and decided not to do anything about it? When does someone's childhood stop being used as an excuse for bad behavior?

I'm sorry, there seems to be this sentiment that Dean is still a hero in season 9, that he was justified in "saving" Sam, and that Sam is still the one in the wrong, hence the Cain/Abel parallel. I don't see it that way at all. To me, Dean is the one who has been consistently wrong this season and he's the one flirting with evil right now. I think (hope!) that Sam will save him in the end.

I apologize Far Away Eyes for my far less than positive ramblings. I came into the fandom during Season 4, at the height of the Sam is EVIL phase and it's SO frustrating to me to see all this sympathy and understanding thrown Dean's way this year. I remember the season premiere and Sam's desperate plea to Death not to be brought back via supernatural means, his exhausted face and hope to never be the instrument of death again. And that's exactly what happened.

I seem to be at odds with most of the fandom. Most are trying to excuse Dean's actions and all I can think about is the violation of Sam's personhood on the most basic level, and the way he looked at the end of 9.1, walking stiffly by Dean: like a walking corpse, only alive because Dean wants it.

God, I really sound melodramatic but that's the way I feel. I need a break from fandom I think.
Thanks for the comment.

I may not have been around during season 4, but I always found myself sympathizing much more with Sam during that story arc than Dean. Why? Because i understood why Sam was doing what he was doing. He couldn't stop Dean from going to Hell so he decided to do whatever it took to perhaps get revenge and possibly find a way to get Dean back. I've thought that Sam's actions from season 4-now are all tied to that moment in "No Rest for the Wicked" when Dean is sent to Hell and Sam couldn't stop it.

As for the current situation, I'm sympathetic towards both absolutely. Dean was going off of words his brother spoke while doing the Trials---such as "I want to kill a hellhound and not die" and I think the fact that he's always had that command from John ringing in his ears is another driving force in this matter. I feel for him. He's kinda stuck in a time loop of his own in that regard.

That being said, I am so sympathetic towards Sam and how he feels. Dean may have taken Sam's words from while he was doing the Trials, but he ignored Sam's words in that cabin with Death and it cost him a lot. He was not in control of his body nor was he aware of it. That fall out has been heartbreaking for me to watch. I totally understand where he's coming from and how he feels about it and why.

I think, if we were to strip away the supernatural aspects of angels and deals and possession, we'd see that in a lot of ways this story line has us asking questions about end of life decisions. It's always going to be a difficult discussion with people and it will always be divided. I don't think there's ever a right or final answer on the matter, either.

Either way I think we're going to see them have to deal with this both as individuals and as brothers.I think they're going to have to assess what it exactly means for them and how they proceed going forward.

Thanks again.
cheryl42
# cheryl42 2014-01-27 20:45
I mentioned this on Gerry's review...what if Dean saw what Sam was going to do in the cabin with Death was no different in his eyes than Sam about to eat a bullet in the warehouse with Lucifer. Dean even said to Zeke/Gad "Sam what are you doing?" In Deans mind he had to stop Sam from essentially committing suicide. He had a plan, Cas vouched for Zeke so Dean went with it. It was a crappy plan but for Dean the only option he had in the moments he had to decide. Of course the plan went sideways and now everyone is paying for it. Most of all Kevin.
cheryl42
# cheryl42 2014-01-27 20:45
I mentioned this on Gerry's review...what if Dean saw what Sam was going to do in the cabin with Death was no different in his eyes than Sam about to eat a bullet in the warehouse with Lucifer. Dean even said to Zeke/Gad "Sam what are you doing?" In Deans mind he had to stop Sam from essentially committing suicide. He had a plan, Cas vouched for Zeke so Dean went with it. It was a crappy plan but for Dean the only option he had in the moments he had to decide. Of course the plan went sideways and now everyone is paying for it. Most of all Kevin.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 22:14
Quoting cheryl42:
I mentioned this on Gerry's review...what if Dean saw what Sam was going to do in the cabin with Death was no different in his eyes than Sam about to eat a bullet in the warehouse with Lucifer. Dean even said to Zeke/Gad "Sam what are you doing?" In Deans mind he had to stop Sam from essentially committing suicide. He had a plan, Cas vouched for Zeke so Dean went with it. It was a crappy plan but for Dean the only option he had in the moments he had to decide. Of course the plan went sideways and now everyone is paying for it. Most of all Kevin.


Thanks for the comment.

I think that's a nice parallel. Sam was being told to basically eat a bullet by his hallucination and Dean stopped that. I feel, in a lot of ways, if Sam had died it would have been a bit in vain. He chose, while awake, to stop the Trials. To die and not complete them is kinda pointless in my view.

It doesn't excuse Dean by any means, but I think in the aftermath they both will have to work through what has happened, I look forward to seeing how that happens.

Thanks again.
Far Away Eyes
# Far Away Eyes 2014-01-27 22:14
Quote:
I mentioned this on Gerry's review...what if Dean saw what Sam was going to do in the cabin with Death was no different in his eyes than Sam about to eat a bullet in the warehouse with Lucifer. Dean even said to Zeke/Gad "Sam what are you doing?" In Deans mind he had to stop Sam from essentially committing suicide. He had a plan, Cas vouched for Zeke so Dean went with it. It was a crappy plan but for Dean the only option he had in the moments he had to decide. Of course the plan went sideways and now everyone is paying for it. Most of all Kevin.
Thanks for the comment.

I think that's a nice parallel. Sam was being told to basically eat a bullet by his hallucination and Dean stopped that. I feel, in a lot of ways, if Sam had died it would have been a bit in vain. He chose, while awake, to stop the Trials. To die and not complete them is kinda pointless in my view.

It doesn't excuse Dean by any means, but I think in the aftermath they both will have to work through what has happened, I look forward to seeing how that happens.

Thanks again.
JuliaG
# JuliaG 2014-01-27 23:32
Far away Eyes, maybe what's pointless to Sam is to have stopped the trials for Dean's sake, only to have Dean betray him right after by letting him be possessed by an angel who killed Kevin with Sam's hand. Just another perspective.

Thank you so much to those of you who answered my post. It's great not to feel so alone in my frustration. The lack of focus on Sam as a character is very disheartening to me. Would it have killed the writers to have ONE Sam-focused episode after he got rid of the angel before Dean was launched into another story?

Anyways, Sam was not suicidal. That was not in the text of the season opener. He was dying, and even the hospital staff was trying to prepare Dean for the inevitable. How can you kill yourself when you're in a coma? Dean heard Sam's wishes through Gadreel clearly. He also knew that Sam would rather die than be possessed again, but he did it anyway. It wasn't a mistake, It wasn't dumb and it wasn't too trusting. He chose to act that way, it was wrong and so unfair to his brother.

Thank Ikeke for the link. I've bookmarked it and will certainly read it.
JuliaG
# JuliaG 2014-01-27 23:32
Far away Eyes, maybe what's pointless to Sam is to have stopped the trials for Dean's sake, only to have Dean betray him right after by letting him be possessed by an angel who killed Kevin with Sam's hand. Just another perspective.

Thank you so much to those of you who answered my post. It's great not to feel so alone in my frustration. The lack of focus on Sam as a character is very disheartening to me. Would it have killed the writers to have ONE Sam-focused episode after he got rid of the angel before Dean was launched into another story?

Anyways, Sam was not suicidal. That was not in the text of the season opener. He was dying, and even the hospital staff was trying to prepare Dean for the inevitable. How can you kill yourself when you're in a coma? Dean heard Sam's wishes through Gadreel clearly. He also knew that Sam would rather die than be possessed again, but he did it anyway. It wasn't a mistake, It wasn't dumb and it wasn't too trusting. He chose to act that way, it was wrong and so unfair to his brother.

Thank Ikeke for the link. I've bookmarked it and will certainly read it.
cheryl42
# cheryl42 2014-01-28 03:14
JuliaG I just thought that when Death told Dean it was Sam's choice to live or die Dean took that to mean that Sam was about to kill himself.
I also hope that we have an episode that allows Sam to express for himself how he feels. We so rarely get any insight into Sam that when we do it always seems shocking to us as well as Dean.
cheryl42
# cheryl42 2014-01-28 03:14
JuliaG I just thought that when Death told Dean it was Sam's choice to live or die Dean took that to mean that Sam was about to kill himself.
I also hope that we have an episode that allows Sam to express for himself how he feels. We so rarely get any insight into Sam that when we do it always seems shocking to us as well as Dean.
Manzanita Crow
# Manzanita Crow 2014-01-28 15:32
JuliaG

I totally agree with you. Sam was not actively trying to commit suicide in Ep1, but merely accepting his time had come.

As for asking Death to make it final, there was also the possibility that Lucifer might bring Sam back to wear to the prom, if he ever escaped the cage. Perfectly sensible from my POV.

Regardless of Sam's state of mind, I don't believe letting an effectively unknown angel inside his mind and soul was an acceptable course of action. Sam would have known the possible risks to others from possession and rejected such a solution, quite rightly in my opinion.

Much as I love Sam, he's right that his life is not worth more than that of others.
Manzanita Crow
# Manzanita Crow 2014-01-28 15:32
JuliaG

I totally agree with you. Sam was not actively trying to commit suicide in Ep1, but merely accepting his time had come.

As for asking Death to make it final, there was also the possibility that Lucifer might bring Sam back to wear to the prom, if he ever escaped the cage. Perfectly sensible from my POV.

Regardless of Sam's state of mind, I don't believe letting an effectively unknown angel inside his mind and soul was an acceptable course of action. Sam would have known the possible risks to others from possession and rejected such a solution, quite rightly in my opinion.

Much as I love Sam, he's right that his life is not worth more than that of others.